Brown Pelican in West Texas


Hot days and no new birds.  The migration isn’t here yet, although I have received reports that it has started up north, so they are on the way here.  I will welcome them.  Anyway, in the meantime, it is back to my archives to see what I have forgotten about.

Going all the way back to 2011, and what did I find.  A bunch of photos of a Brown Pelicans that made an out-of-the-way stop at the City Water Ponds down in Eldorado.  They are indigent to the gulf coast, but on rare occasions one will make it’s way to our warm climes here in west Texas.

On this particular occasion, our friends that live in Eldorado, only a few blocks from the ponds, called us immediately after they spotted him.  It’s nice to have friends in high places.  Anyway, we were down there within an hour.  Here are a few of the images that I was able to get.

Brown Pelican

Brown Pelican

Brown Pelican

Brown Pelican

Look Ma!!!

Look Ma!!!

Brown Pelican in flight

Brown Pelican in flight

Brown Pelican in flight.

Brown Pelican in flight.

Click on any image to see some enlargements.  Hope you enjoy.

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7 thoughts on “Brown Pelican in West Texas

  1. Great pics, Bob! I have only ever seen white pelicans (at least, I think that’s what they were) on a trip to Florida. Amazing that the migration has started in northern US already. We always used to know it had started when the cuckoos went quiet but sadly we hear so few of them these days (I only heard one all summer this year). Swallows, swifts and house martins are still with us and will probably be here until around 22-23 September which seems to be their annual departure date!

  2. I just moved back to Texas from Florida and the Brown Pelican was a favorite. What I miss most , I believe, is the Anhingas…wow what beautiful birds. Thanks for the beautiful pictures Bob.

    • Thanks for the great comment, whoever you are. I hope you will do so again. And welome back to Texas.

      We had an Anhinga visit San Angelo a couple of years ago. Quite a surprise, since they are usually found along the coast.

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