More images of The Big Bend


I’m going to do a little different for today’s post.  Not that I don’t enjoy the avian photos, I also dearly love the Big Bend area of west Texas.  But this blog is also about photography in general.  So looking back through my archives, I pulled the following eight photos out of the files.  I may or may not have shown some of them before, but if I have, have another look and enjoy.

Boquillas Canyon.  Boquillas Canyon is located on the far east side of Big Bend National Park.  There is a little trail at the end of the highway that leads directly to the entrance.  When standing in the entrance, it is a humbling experience, as right in front of you, across the Rio Grande only about 50 yards away, a cliff rises straight up from the water nearly 2,000  feet.  Talk about feeling tiny!!  This photo was taken from a few miles away, from a hill where you have a view across the river.  In the foreground, is the Mexican village of Boquillas.  Note the multi-story buildings that appear as tiny boxes.

Boquillas Canyon and Boquillas Village from across the Rio Grande

Santa Elena Canyon.  This is one of my favorite views of the Santa Elena.  It was taken back around 1985 during one of my first visits to the Big Bend National Park.  We were driving south on the Old Maverick Road.  The Ocotillo plants were in bloom with their fiery blossoms.  As we rounded a curve this sight met our eyes.  We were still about 3 miles from the canyon, but I decided to frame it between the Ocotillos.  I hope you like it.

Santa Elena Canyon and Ocotillo

The Big Hill.  Highway 170 from Lajitas to Presidio, Texas, is one of the most spectacularly, scenic drives in the United States.  As you travel through there you have the Rio Grande River direct on your left.  Across the river on the Mexican side rise towering mountains.  On the right side of your car are the mountains of Big Bend Ranch State Park.  About 12 miles west of Lajitas you climb to one of the highest points on the road, aptly, named the Big Hill.  At nearly 500 feet straight up, above the Rio Grande you have awesome views both to the west and to the east.  These are two of my images from that hill.

Rio Grande River looking west from the Big Hill

Rio Grand River looking east from the Big Hill

Mule Ears Peak.  As you drive along Ross Maxwell drive in Big Bend National Park you will see this landmark that rises south of the Chisos Moutains.  This image was taken late in the afternoon when the setting sun was just hitting the upper parts of the peak/s.

Mule Ears Peak

The Window.  High in the Chisos Mountains is what is called The Basin.  The basin is where the Chisos Mountain Lodge and campgrounds are located.  The elevation of the floor of the basin is 5,000 feet.  I guess it was named the basin, because it is surrounded by mountain peaks that rise further higher to an elevation of around 8,000 feet.  On the western side of the basin is this V-shaped formation, aptly called the Window.  This is a pour-off.  All of the water that is collected in the basin, drains down the slope to the bottom of the V where it drops over the edge several hundred feet to the Chihuahuan Desert below.  It is a one of the most photographed views in the park, especially at sunset.  A trail leads from the lodge parking lot, down to the botom of the window.  A hike of about a mile, the elevation dropes 800 feet.  That makes for a very strenuous return.

Look west from The Window

Casa Grande thru The Window.  This photograph was taken from the Ross Maxwell highway a few miles west of the Chisos Mountains.  In this image you are looking back “into” the Window.  You can see Mount Casa Grande, which is on the far eastern side of the basin.  Mt. Casa Grande is not the largest peak in the Chisos, but the most photographed.

Mount Casa Grande through the Window

Mount Casa Grande.  As stated previously,  Casa Grande peak is the most  photogenic peak in the park.  This image was taken in the late afternoon as the western sun was striking it.

Mount Casa Grande

I hope you have this, another visual tour of the Big Bend area.  Maybe there will be more on another day.  Click on any image to see an enlargement.

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7 thoughts on “More images of The Big Bend

  1. Hi Bob:
    Your images of the park are lovely – you seem to understand the spirit of the land very well. Would you consider donating the use of any of your images to the Friends of Big Bend National Park, for use in our newsletters or grant work?
    If so, please let me know!
    Courtney Lyons-Garcia
    Executive Director

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