Ruby-throated Hummingbirds


Happy July4th everybody!!!

On July 1st I posted photos of the Black-chinned Hummingbirds.  Today I will show you some of my images of the Ruby-throated Hummingbird (Archilochus colubris).

After publishing that post, Cindy Kilpatrick commented about the sharpness of my photos at such high ISOs.  I use a noise-reduction software called DeNoise, made by Topaz Labs.  It reduces noise without any loss of detail.  It sells for 79.95 and it is some of best money I ever spent.  I also use, in conjunction with that, another software called Focus Magic.  Between the two, I get these great results.

Click on any image to see a beautiful enlargement.  Enjoy.

Ruby-throated Hummingbird
  • Canon EOS 40D
  • Canon 500mm lens with 1.4 teleconverter – tripod mounted
  • 1/500 sec. @ f7.1
  • ISO 800
  • Lens focal distance 700mm
  • Metering – center weighted average
  • Aperture priority
Ruby -throated Hummingbird
  • Canon EOS 20D
  • Canon 100-400mm zoom lens – hand-held
  • 1/60 sec. @ f5.6
  • ISO 400
  • Lens focal distance 400mm
  • Aperture priority
  • Metering – not recorded

    Ruby-throated Hummingbird at feeder

  • Canon EOS 40D
  • Canon 500mm lens with 1.4 tele-converter – tripod mounted
  • 1/200 sec. @ f5.6
  • ISO 800
  • Lens focal distance 700mm
  • Metering – Center weighted average
  • Aperture priority

Ruby-throated Hummingbird

  • Canon EOS 40D
  • Canon 500mm lens with 1.4 tele-conerter – tripod mounted
  • 1/250 @f5.6
  • ISO 800
  • Lens focal distance 700mm
  • Metering – Center weighted average
  • Aperture priority

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12 thoughts on “Ruby-throated Hummingbirds

  1. I’m very late in, but so glad I didn’t miss this. The pictures, as always, are gorgeous and I appreciate your sharing your processing secrets. Eighty bucks, eh? Hmmmm. 🙂

    • Thanks so much, Cindy. Eighty bucks for the DeNoise software. I forget what Focus Magic cost. Probably not much more. When I use both of them in concert, I really get great results.

  2. I’ve never seen a hummingbird actually land – only hover at the feeder! So far this season, I’ve only seen one (and I’ve forgotten how small they actually are). Stunning images (as always)! 🙂

  3. Bob, these are beautiful. You have so much patience to wait for them to land and sit still. They hardly ever do. The detail of the feathers came out very well, and the color in the third photo up is very rich.

    If you ever get a chance you should consider going to Monte Verde Costa Rica to visit the Humming Bird Garden there. Hummers from bumble bee size up to seven inches long from beak tip to tail’s end! Toucans, Quetzels, Bell birds… I think you would enjoy it.

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