Eldorado Weekend of 42 Species


In my previous post I mentioned that we had seen 42 species at the Eldorado Water Treatment ponds and surrounding area.  Maybe some of my readers would be interested in the entire list.  All viewed within about 3 hours.

  1. Turkey Vultures  15
  2. Chihuahuan Raven  3
  3. Northern Cardinal  2
  4. Baltimore Oriole  2
  5. Lesser Goldfinch  6
  6. House Finch  10
  7. Black-chinned Hummingbird  4
  8. House Wren  2
  9. Pied-billed Grebes  24
  10. White-winged Dove15
  11. Mourning Dove  8
  12. Yellow Warbler  3
  13. Barn Swallow  25
  14. Northern Shoveler  50
  15. Scissor-tailed Flycatcher  13
  16. Clay-colored Sparrow  3
  17. Eastern Phoebe  2
  18. Egyptian Goose  2
  19. Great Egret  1
  20. Northern Pintail  24
  21. Wilson’s Phalarope  16
  22. Great Blue Heron  2
  23. Blue-winged Teal  18
  24. Green-winged Teal  17
  25. Blue Grosbeak  1
  26. Vermilion Flycatcher  1
  27. Red-winged Blackbird  5
  28. Yellow-headed Blackbird  2
  29. Spotted Sandpiper  3
  30. Baird’s Sandpiper  1
  31. Greater Roadrunne  4
  32. Lesser Scaup1
  33. Red-tailed Hawk  1
  34. Marsh Wren  25
  35. Common Yellowthroat  1
  36. Belted Kingfisher  1
  37. White-faced Ibis  26
  38. Dickcissel  6
  39. Savannah Sparrow  1
  40. Green Heron  1
  41. European Starling  4
  42. House Sparrow  8

Another Foray to Eldorado Water Treatment Ponds


This past weekend Ann and I decided to make another trip to one of our favorite birding haunts. the water treatment ponds at Eldorado, Texas.  Our friends, Suzanne and Sid Johnson, who live there accompanied us.  It was fruitful day, to say the least, as we saw 42 different species.  Three of the highlights are pictured below.

The first is a Wilson’s Warbler, (Wilsonia pusilla).  A pretty little yellow bird, identified by the black crown on it’s head.  This one was in a Hackberry tree along with a few of it’s friends.

Wilson's Warbler

  • Canon EOS 7D with Canon 500mm lens with 1.4 teleconverter
  • 1/640 sec. @ f13 minus 2/3 EV adjustment – ISO 100
  • Lens focal distance – 700mm
  • Partial metering
  • Shutter priority

After that we came across this bird sitting on a fence.  It was hard to ID at first, because of difficulty in getting close enough.  I thought it looked familiar, but wasn’t able to confirm what I saw until I was able to maneuver the car so I could get a shot with my long lens.  It is a Dickcissel (Spiza americana).  This is either a winter male, or a first year male.

Dickcissel

  • Canon EOS 7D with Canon 500mm lens with 1.4 teleconverter
  • 1/800 sec @ f6.3 – ISO 100
  • Lens focal distance – 700mm
  • Partial metering
  • Shutter priority

Along the ponds there an abundance of reeds.  In those reeds we saw a large proliferation of Marsh Wrens (Cistothorus palustris).

Marsh Wren

  • Canon EOS 7D with Canon 100-400mm zoom lens
  • 1/1250 sec. @ f5/6 minus 2/3 EV adjustment – ISO 400
  • Lens focal distance – 340mm
  • Spot metering
  • Shutter priority

A  side note to this story.  Late last night I received an e-mail from Suzanne Johnson.  She and Sid made another trip to the ponds after dinner and saw four Soras (Porzanna carolina).  They are the first ever to be seen in that area.

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