Vermilion Flycatcher and more


First I want to thank all of the well wishers that commented about my surgery last week.  It is nice to know that I have so many loyal followers out there.  So, having said that, on Monday morning after a week of re-cooperating, Ann and I ventured out to do a bit of birding, and maybe get some photo ops.

We first stopped at the San  Angelo State Park, where we haven’t been for several weeks.  There was almost no activity around the bird blind there, so after a quick drive around we headed to Middle Concho and Spring Creek parks.  Never a problem there, when it comes to seeing birds.  Of course, getting some decent photographs is another thing.  I wasn’t very successful in that department.  The highlight was getting this photo of a Vermilion Flycatcher.  If you follow me on Facebook, you probably have already seen it, as I was anxious to show it off yesterday.  I believe it is my best photo of the species to date.

Vermilion Flycatcher

Vermilion Flycatcher

After getting that shot, I figured that would be a hard act to follow.  As usual at those parks, I had another opportunity to photograph a Great Blue Heron.  This one was wading in the Middle Concho River.

Great Blue Heron

Great Blue Heron

Earlier in the day, while we were still out at San Angelo State Park, Ann had to make a pit stop at one of the restrooms.  While I waited in the car, I watched this American Kestrel flying around about 125 yards away.  It would go from one tree to another.  As it finally lit on this fence post for a few seconds, I was able to photograph it with my Canon EOS 7D and 500mm lens and 1.4 tele-converter, from my car window.

American Kestrel on fence post.

American Kestrel on fence post.

I hope you enjoyed these photos.  Click on any of them to see enlargements.  The birding total talley for the morning was 34.  Here is the total list if you are interested.  This includes birds from the parks mentioned above, plus a little pond in The Bluffs residential area.

  1. American Coot
  2. Ring-necked Duck
  3. Gadwall
  4. Pied-billed Grebe
  5. American Wigeon
  6. Northern Mockingbird
  7. Hooded Merganzer
  8. Golden-fronted Woodpecker
  9. House Sparrow
  10. House Finch
  11. Mourning Dove
  12. Northern Cardinal
  13. Red-winged Blackbird
  14. American Kestrel
  15. European Starling
  16. Killdeer
  17. Belted Kingfisher
  18. Double-crested Cormorant
  19. Northern Shoveler
  20. Great Blue Heron
  21. Yellow-rumped Warbler
  22. Eastern Bluebird
  23. Eastern Phoebe
  24. White-winged Dove
  25. Ladder-backed Woodpecker
  26. Cedar Waxwing
  27. Vermilion Flycatcher
  28. Western Meadowlark
  29. Mute Swan
  30. Ruby-crowned Kinglet
  31. Red-tailed Hawk
  32. Wild Turkey
  33. Black Vulture
  34. Ring-billed Gulls
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24 thoughts on “Vermilion Flycatcher and more

  1. Bob, the first time I met an American Kestrel was when it snatched a mocking bird right out of the sky and rained feathers in my back yard! Beautiful, but deadly birds! 😉 Your photos in this set are so amazing!
    Glad you are back in business too!

  2. That is an awesome shot of the vermilion flycatcher. Jean McSwain

    On Wed, 19 Dec 2012 12:09:18 +0000 Texas Tweeties by Bob Zeller

  3. Well, if that’s not your best VF photo, I’d like to see the others, Bob. I, too, am glad to hear you’re recovering enough to do some birding. My wife had gallbladder surgery over the summer, and I’m not telling her about your recent escapades.

  4. Wow! He’s a beauty. Only time I ever saw one was at Rattlesnake Springs near Guadalupe Peak. Striking little feathered friend. (Incidentally, I’m still enjoying the yellow-rumps and an occasional Wilson’s in the backyard from the window. They are stinking cute little guys!)

    Sorry I’ve been away. In the words of the Terminator, “Ah’ll be back.” 🙂

  5. A dazzling pic of the Vermilion Flycatcher. What a brilliant bird! You almost need sunglasses. Glad to know you are getting out again, Bob – I can tell how much that means to you. Hoping that you have a wonderful Christmas.

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