Sparrows – The forgotten and ignored birds.


Jane Cheese, a fellow blogger (her link), recently commented and wondered if I had a photo of a Savannah Sparrow.  It didn’t take much searching to find one in my files.  It seems that I have been negligent in spending much time photographing the many species of sparrows.  Maybe it is because, that most of them are more or less bland in appearance, or maybe it is because I have the most difficulty in identifying them.

Nevertheless, I came across photographs of several of the many species of sparrows.  Here are a few of my most show-worthy images.  I hope that after looking at these, you will have a better appreciation for these species.

Savannah Sparrow

Savannah Sparrow

Song Sparrow

Song Sparrow

Black-throated Sparrow

Black-throated Sparrow

Chipping Sparrow

Chipping Sparrow

Clay-colored Sparrow

Clay-colored Sparrow

Lark Sparrow

Lark Sparrow

Lincoln Sparrow

Lincoln Sparrow

Rufous-crowned Sparrow

Rufous-crowned Sparrow

Vesper Sparrow

Vesper Sparrow

White-crowned Sparrow

White-crowned Sparrow

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31 thoughts on “Sparrows – The forgotten and ignored birds.

  1. A very nice and diverse collection of sparrow images, Bob. My favorites are the Black-throated, Lark and White-crowned. I’m like you, I don’t photograph them as often as I should and I have a difficult time with their ID. Well done.

  2. Chipping sparrow! That’s 103 for me now. We’ve had a few here; it’s the first we’ve seen them. Lovely kudos to the sparrow. They rarely get the attention they deserve. (Like spiders and snakes, they need an advocate too.) 🙂

  3. I agree with what you said about sparrows Bob, and I’ll throw in that I have a tough time photographing them because they are typically ground feeders and difficult to get a clear shot of them while they’re on the ground. I do love listening to the song sparrows in the spring, even if I seldom get a good photo of them.

  4. That’s a lot of sparrows to distinguish between! And they are quite handsome when you study them closely – especially the lark sparrow, the black-throated and white-crowned. Lovely shots, and I feel as if I’m learning a lot about Texan birds!

  5. With all due respect, Bob, I looked up both in my guides and think this looks more like a female Red-winged blackbird than a savannah. The savannah has more of a moustache and lines going downward on the face rather than upward and the lower belly is white with striped flanks.I agree that when I started to ID more than the house sparrow was when i got into birding in a more serious way, but out of practice and can often be wrong.

    • This is embarrassing, Jane, I believe you are right. That file, I think was mis-IDed originally and put in the wrong file, with my Savannahs. I have replaced another image above, and I believe, (I hope) it is trully a Savannah Sparrow.

      • Bravo! It is nice to see -I don’t have my own photo of one- and I can see the yellow lore that isn’t always apparent. Thanks Bob, for your diligence-I love all the photos and agree-sparrows are interesting ! Jane

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