More updated images from Fort Davis


Before I get into this post, I was just perusing the comments on my About Me page and my Marfan Syndrome page.  I had forgotten that there were so many nice and caring people out there that follow my posts.  I hope you’all are still there.  I definitely appreciate you and it is you that keeps me interested in keeping up this blog.

Okay, as most of you know, Ann and I spent nearly a week in Fort Davis, Texas.  Fort Davis is named for a restored frontier fort of the same name.  A neat little town at the base of the Davis Mountains.  We love the area because of the potential for great wildlife photos, not to mention the great scenery at this altitude of about 5,000 feet.  Higher if you get up to the nearby McDonald Observatory.

In my recent post I described the local area, the Davis Mountains Inn, etc.  I won’t get into that again as I don’t want to repeat myself.  I will now get you up to date with some of the photos that I took while there.  Ann was a big help with her spotting.  I tend to try to drive safely, (yeah, right), and keep my eyes on the road so I depend on her to watch the trees, high wire lines, and fences.  As yet, I don’t have a bumper sticker that says, “I brake for birds”.  For the record, we recorded 62 different species of birds, 12 of them to be added to our 2015 Big Year list.

First, I must say that there are many Red-tailed Hawks in the area.

Red-tailed Hawk along the highway.

Red-tailed Hawk along the highway.

But we can’t ignore the other species.

Chipping Sparrow

Chipping Sparrow

Ladder-backed Woodpecker

Ladder-backed Woodpecker

On Tuesday of our stay, we ventured over Wild Rose Pass and drove down to Balmorhea, Texas, a distance of 38 miles.  It wasn’t so much that we had a reason to visit that town, it was the journey that we loved.  Raptors appeared on posts and fences and hunted over the land.  Other wildlife could be seen, too.  Aoudads, (pictured below), Pronghorned Antelope, Bobcat, and Muledeer.

Aoudads, also know as Barbary Sheep, stand on a ridge near Wild Rose Pass.

Aoudads, also know as Barbary Sheep, stand on a ridge near Wild Rose Pass.

Did I say there were many Red-tailed Hawks?

Red-tailed Hawk

Red-tailed Hawk

Lark Bunting

Lark Bunting – female

Just west of Balmorhea is the Balmorhea State Park.  They have some wonderful wetland areas to visit.  This is a rather small park so it is easy to get around.

Red-winged Blackbird

Red-winged Blackbird

A Bufflehead enjoys splashing around.

A Bufflehead enjoys splashing around.

Lesser Scaup

Lesser Scaup

Ring-necked Duck

Ring-necked Duck

A Canada Goose flies overhead.

A Canada Goose flies overhead.

A happy Western Meadowlark sings his song.

A happy Western Meadowlark sings his song.

Savannah Sparrow

Savannah Sparrow

Before returning back over the pass to Fort Davis and our room at the inn, we stopped at this great little restaurant in Balmorhea.  I forget the name, but the sign says it is the “Cutest Restaurant in Balmorhea”.  If you are in the area I recommend the food here.  We ate the traditional stacked enchiladas with hot sauce, topped with a fried egg.  Can’t wait to get back there.

And we will end this post with, you guessed it, another Red-tailed Hawk.

REd-tailed Hawk

Red-tailed Hawk.  This one seems to be saying, “If I stay behind this twig, I can’t be seen.”

Again, many thanks to all who follow this post.  Click on the photos to see enlargements.  If you like to comment, I sure would like to hear from you.  Since our return from our trek to the mountains, I have been busy trying to get some more local photographs for you.  I will post again in a few days.

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24 thoughts on “More updated images from Fort Davis

  1. Mr. Bob, as always yoou have “out-done” yourself yet again.

    I don’t always comment on each post of yours, but know I’m still here and still looking and reading each one.

    Between work and raising a child and another child in Law School, I have no free time for photography anymore….maybe if I take up bird watching, I could do that from my deck here at the house.

    Take care of you and yours…and as always God Bless.

    Raven

    • Raven, it is nice of you to remind me of this. Sometimes when I don’t hear from people in a long time, I tend to forget that there are a lot of people out there that still read my posts. I am glad you are one of them. If you do take up ‘birdwatching’, watch out, it is contagious, easy to get hooked on it. 🙂

  2. Thank you for the photos. A few years ago my wife & I spent time at the Davis mountains. Went to see the only quail I hadn’t put on my list. The Montezuma, but sorry to say I wasn’t successful. May have to return someday.

    • Thanks for the comment, Joseph. In the several times that we have been there, we have only seen the Montezuma Quail once. However, the park personnel says they are still making their daily trips in to get drinks at the water. It is just difficult to predict when they will do so.

  3. Beautiful photos, Bob! For what it’s worth the “I Brake For Birds” bumper sticker didn’t help much on my old car. Much better to have Ann spotting for you. 🙂

    • Thanks, Lisa. I generally try to keep out of the way of traffic. Fortunately, out here it is very easy to do, as traffic is quite sparse on the roads and highways of western Texas. It is not unusual for me to just stop in the middle of a road to observe or take a shot. 🙂

  4. Enjoyed your description, thought you’d be spotting the birds and Ann yelling, “Watch out!” before you ran off the road. Although I don’t always comment, I always stop to look at your photos when they arrive in my e-mail.Thank you for sharing . All the best, Jane

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