Happy Fourth of July


I am wishing everybody a happy and safe July 4th weekend.  Ann and I have been here and there since my last post, several days ago.  But, not to worry, we saw many of the avian species and I obtained a nice collection of photographs.  During that time we were invited to Stephen and Nakia’s place in the Davis Mountains.  They have several acres at an elevation of about 6,000 feet.  They have set up a nice birding area.  He had a portable blind, but I preferred my more comfortable mobile blind, AKA, my Ford Escape.  I was able to position it for nice observation and photo shooting.   I will show you a few of those images first.  Please click on any image to see a nice enlargement of each.

This photo will fool you.  It is a juvenile Curve-billed Thrasher.  Probably a first year, it hasn’t developed the long, curved bill or the bright orange eye of an adult.

CORRECTION:  It has been brought to my attention by one of my readers, that it is actually a female Brown-headed Cowbird.  I should have been more careful in checking the identification.  There are similarities but the main difference is the size of the bill.  A juvenile Curve-billed Thrasher would have been shorter, but much thinner.

Curve-billed Thrasher - juvenile

Brown-headed Cowbird – female

I love the little White-breasted Nuthatches, but they are dizzying to watch, as sometimes they are going up and other time going down head-first.

White-breasted Nuthatch

White-breasted Nuthatch

Identifying some of the flycatchers are difficult for me.  At first I thought this was an Ash-throated Flycatcher, but after seeking further advice, it was decided otherwise to be a Western Wood-Pewee.

Western Wood-Pewee

Western Wood-Pewee

In this photo of an Ash-throated Flycatcher, you can see the differences.

Ash-throated Flycatcher

Ash-throated Flycatcher

A noisy, feisth Black-crested Titmouse made it’s presence known.

Black-crested Titmouse

Black-crested Titmouse

The hummingbirds had arrived in the mountains and I caught this female Black-chinned in flight.

Black-chinned Hummingbird - female

Black-chinned Hummingbird – female

We loved being in the mountains, but we were only able to spend one day there, because of commitments back home.  After taking care of those on our return, we spent time locally and captured more photos.

Bullock’s Oriole captured near Twin Buttes Reservoir, as were the following Eastern Phoebe and the Yellow-billed Cuckoo.

Bullock's Oriole

Bullock’s Oriole

Eastern Phoebe

Eastern Phoebe

Yellow-billed Cuckoo

Yellow-billed Cuckoo

Driving downtown near the Concho River, we saw this Green Heron on the other side of the water atop a dead tree.

Green Heron in tree

Green Heron in tree

Out at San Angelo State Park, we saw these two birds, the Scissor-tailed Flycatcher and the ever popular Greater Roadrunner.

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher

Greater Roadrunner

Greater Roadrunner

I hope you all enjoyed this collection.  I will be back sometime after the holiday.

 

Happy birding!!

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12 thoughts on “Happy Fourth of July

  1. Happy 4th to you and Ann also. I think it would be nice and cool at the higher elevation. Enjoyed each of the birds in this post. I just think wood-pewee is a funny name for a nice looking bird!
    hugs

  2. Wow! Great sightings! The Western Wood Peewee is best id’d by it’s call, so I have been told.I shot a ruby-throated hummingbird recently and was confused because of poor lighting.Really enjoyed this group.m and we started the weekend with Canada Day so I wish you well as you close it off with Independence Day!

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