Something New, Something Old


While trying to get new material, AKA photos, for my posts, the birds are not co-0perating much for me these warm days.  But, having said that, I do have a few new ones that I captured recently, and I will combine them with some older ones from my archives.   A few of them I may have never posted, so even they may be new to you.

First, I would like to bring to your attention an error that I made a few weeks ago.  An alert reader, Carla Savage, e-mailed me and asked me to re-check the ID of a photo that I posted on July 2, as a juvenile Curve-billed Thrasher.  It turns out that it is actually a female Brown-headed Cowbird.  There are similarities, and a friend had insisted that it was the Thrasher.  I took his word, and didn’t take a closer look.  As I said they are similar to each other, however the beak of the bird in the photos, is a bit too thick for a thrasher.  I thank Carla for correcting me.

Now back to some photos.  Here are a some from my archives.

I got lucky one day at the bird blind at San Angelo State Park.  This female Ruby-throated Hummingbird showed up and really got interested int the water dripping from the rocks.

Ruby-throated Hummingbidrd

Ruby-throated Hummingbidrd – female

While roaming along the brush line at the edge of Spring Creek Park, I saw this Carolina Wren perched on a branch.

Carolina Wren

Carolina Wren

And one of my personal all time favorites, I photographed this American Kestrel at San Angelo State Park a few years ago.  Because it was so far away, the image didn’t lend itself to doing a close crop, so I opted for this nearly full frame adaptation.  Somehow, during editing I accidentally came up with this 3D effect.  I don’t have any idea, except a guess, how it happened.  But regardless how it happened, I love it.

American Kestrel in tree.

American Kestrel in tree.

A couple of years ago, during a little drive through Spring Creek Park, we spotted a large dark bird on a branch.  At first we thought it was just a Turkey Vulture.  But as we got closer we realized it was a Zone-tailed Hawk, and it had it’s lunch spread on the branch.  One reason we were initially fooled, is because the Zone-tailed Hawk behaves like a vulture.  It perches like one and flew like one.

Zone-tailed Hawk

Zone-tailed Hawk

A couple of years ago we made a trip to Pedernales State Park.  It is one our favorite birding spots when we want to make little trips out of town.  They have two large bird blinds that make for excellent bird viewing.  This is an image of a Summer Tanager that I got on that trip.

Summer Tanager

Summer Tanager

Now back to some more recent photos, I captured this Northern Bobwhite a few days ago at San Angelo State Park.

Northern Bobwhite

Northern Bobwhite

This Greater Roadrunner showed up on the same trip to that park.

Greater Roadrunner

Greater Roadrunner

This morning Ann and I visited a favorite spot near Twin Buttes Reservoir.  We saw several birds, but the following two photos were really the highlights of the one hour stay.  This adult male Painted Bunting…….

Painted Bunting

Painted Bunting

…….and this juvenile Vermilion Flycatcher, possibly a first year male.

Vermilion Flycatcher - juvenile

Vermilion Flycatcher – juvenile

I hope you enjoyed the photographs.  Click on any of the images to see some nice enlargements.

Happy Birding!!