More updated images from Fort Davis


Before I get into this post, I was just perusing the comments on my About Me page and my Marfan Syndrome page.  I had forgotten that there were so many nice and caring people out there that follow my posts.  I hope you’all are still there.  I definitely appreciate you and it is you that keeps me interested in keeping up this blog.

Okay, as most of you know, Ann and I spent nearly a week in Fort Davis, Texas.  Fort Davis is named for a restored frontier fort of the same name.  A neat little town at the base of the Davis Mountains.  We love the area because of the potential for great wildlife photos, not to mention the great scenery at this altitude of about 5,000 feet.  Higher if you get up to the nearby McDonald Observatory.

In my recent post I described the local area, the Davis Mountains Inn, etc.  I won’t get into that again as I don’t want to repeat myself.  I will now get you up to date with some of the photos that I took while there.  Ann was a big help with her spotting.  I tend to try to drive safely, (yeah, right), and keep my eyes on the road so I depend on her to watch the trees, high wire lines, and fences.  As yet, I don’t have a bumper sticker that says, “I brake for birds”.  For the record, we recorded 62 different species of birds, 12 of them to be added to our 2015 Big Year list.

First, I must say that there are many Red-tailed Hawks in the area.

Red-tailed Hawk along the highway.

Red-tailed Hawk along the highway.

But we can’t ignore the other species.

Chipping Sparrow

Chipping Sparrow

Ladder-backed Woodpecker

Ladder-backed Woodpecker

On Tuesday of our stay, we ventured over Wild Rose Pass and drove down to Balmorhea, Texas, a distance of 38 miles.  It wasn’t so much that we had a reason to visit that town, it was the journey that we loved.  Raptors appeared on posts and fences and hunted over the land.  Other wildlife could be seen, too.  Aoudads, (pictured below), Pronghorned Antelope, Bobcat, and Muledeer.

Aoudads, also know as Barbary Sheep, stand on a ridge near Wild Rose Pass.

Aoudads, also know as Barbary Sheep, stand on a ridge near Wild Rose Pass.

Did I say there were many Red-tailed Hawks?

Red-tailed Hawk

Red-tailed Hawk

Lark Bunting

Lark Bunting – female

Just west of Balmorhea is the Balmorhea State Park.  They have some wonderful wetland areas to visit.  This is a rather small park so it is easy to get around.

Red-winged Blackbird

Red-winged Blackbird

A Bufflehead enjoys splashing around.

A Bufflehead enjoys splashing around.

Lesser Scaup

Lesser Scaup

Ring-necked Duck

Ring-necked Duck

A Canada Goose flies overhead.

A Canada Goose flies overhead.

A happy Western Meadowlark sings his song.

A happy Western Meadowlark sings his song.

Savannah Sparrow

Savannah Sparrow

Before returning back over the pass to Fort Davis and our room at the inn, we stopped at this great little restaurant in Balmorhea.  I forget the name, but the sign says it is the “Cutest Restaurant in Balmorhea”.  If you are in the area I recommend the food here.  We ate the traditional stacked enchiladas with hot sauce, topped with a fried egg.  Can’t wait to get back there.

And we will end this post with, you guessed it, another Red-tailed Hawk.

REd-tailed Hawk

Red-tailed Hawk.  This one seems to be saying, “If I stay behind this twig, I can’t be seen.”

Again, many thanks to all who follow this post.  Click on the photos to see enlargements.  If you like to comment, I sure would like to hear from you.  Since our return from our trek to the mountains, I have been busy trying to get some more local photographs for you.  I will post again in a few days.

Welcome to cold Fort Davis


Trying something new.  I am writing this post from my iPad, using my WordPress blogging app.

 Ann and I are visiting Fort Davis for a few days.  Our timing was not the best and we arrived Monday with great expectations for some beautiful days for birding.  Even though it was only about 40 degrees when we left San Angelo, by the time we crossed the Davis Mountains at Wild Rose Pass and entered Fort Davis the temperature 80 degrees.  We promptly checked into our room at the Davis Mountains Inn, a bed and breakfast.



Our gracious innkeepers are Bill and Nancy Davis.



The nice weather was short lived.  On Tuesday the forecast was for showers in the mountains, so we opted to take the scenic drive to Balmorhea.  The drive itself is more exciting than Balmorhea, as there are numerous wildlife photo opportunities along the highway.  We saw many Red-tailed Hawks, various small birds, and Aoudads, also known as Barbary sheep.

On Wednesday thunderstorm were forecast for the mountains, but we decided to chance it and take the 75 mile scenic loop through the Davis Mountains.  The temps were much cooler but the birds were active.  A couple that we met that were staying in the Davis Mountains State Park, Paul and Joan Von Hardeman, wanted to tag along in their car.  We were able to make it back to the inn just before a winter storm hit with rain and sleet.   We originally wanted to leave for home this morning, but because of the bad winter driving conditions we opted to stay an extra day.  We have been staying in our room today, finally venturing out for lunch after the ice melted.  We also met another couple that were staying here at the inn.  David and June Seaver, from Akron, Ohio, also waited a bit to leave for their next destination, Big Bend National Park.

Since my other bird and wildlife photos are still on my memory cards, I will have to wait to post them after we get home tomorrow.  I don’t have the means to get them onto my iPad.  By the way, since we left home on Monday morning, we have seen 57 species of birds so far. 

Well, Ann and I are going to drive into Fort Davis for supper at the historic Drugstore, now a great restaurant.  The Art Gallery is upstairs where I have several of my photographs on display and for sale. Bill and Nancy also own this establishment.

I will be posting photographs in a couple of days.