Hot Diggety!! Migration is starting!!


Okay, I might be rushing the season, but with the storm Saturday dropping an average of two inches and the temps dropping into the low nineties and even upper eighties, you can’t blame me for getting excited.  And, right on time, a Yellow Warbler showed up at the bird blind in San Angelo State Park.  I got this photo, which isn’t a very good one because it took me by surprise, and I had a camera in one hand and a breakfast burrito in the other.  It didn’t stay around, so I didn’t get a second chance.  It isn’t as sharp as I would like, but at least, you can tell what it is.

Yellow Warbler

Yellow Warbler

Because of the heat, birding was not very good.  Still, during a few limited short trips out I did get a few images last week.  Please click any image to see some very nice enlargements.

A trip to the Hummer House down near Christoval, netted me a couple good photos of a Black-chinned Hummingbird.

4G7A1523-net-hummer-black-chinned-bob-zeller

Black-chinned Hummingbird

Black-chinned Hummingbird

Back in San Angelo, we went to San Angelo State Park, early one morning.  We stopped at the blind there first and this Curve-billed Thrasher obliged us by making a brief stop.  The light was still a little low but I think my Canon 7D Mark II handled it nicely.

Curve-billed Thrasher

Curve-billed Thrasher

The following morning, we returned to to just take a meandering drive through all of the roads that interlace the park.  It is great fun doing that, as we never know what we will come across.

Cactus Wren

Cactus Wren

There were still numerous Scissor-tailed Flycatchers hanging around.  Because of the shorter tail, I believe this one is a young one.

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - juvenile

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher – juvenile

Before heading home we saw this perched Common Nighthawk, not fully awake yet.

Common Nighthawk

Common Nighthawk

I guess that’s all for this post. I hope to get in more birding in the following days, now that the temperatures are more tolerable, both to me and the birds.

Oh, one more thing.  I have my 2017 Calendars in now.  More beautiful than before.  Twenty bucks plus mailing will get you one.  E-mail me at bobzeller@pobox.com if interested.

You can see more of my photos at http://bobzellerphotography.smugmug.com

Sunday at San Angelo State Park


On Sunday morning, Ann and I decided to visit the bird blind at San Angelo State Park.  There we met our friend, Christie McCorts-Chambers, as she had the same thoughts as ours.  We sat and watched the birds to see if there was anything new to drop by.  There were a couple of Black-chinned Hummingbirds that were quite active and I managed to get some nice shots of those.  Also, I was pleased that a beautiful, male House Finch decided to pose for me.

House Finch

House Finch

Black-chinned Hummingbird

Black-chinned Hummingbird

Black-chinned Hummingbird

Black-chinned Hummingbird

A male Northern Bobwhite made a brief visit at the back of the viewing area, but I managed to get a photo with my Canon 70D and Tamron 150-600mm lens, as I had with all of these photos.   He was about 60 feet away, but as I do with most of my photos, I still was able to crop for a nice close-up.

Northern Bobwhite

Northern Bobwhite

We decided to take a drive around the park.  We asked Christie to join us so we spent a couple hours checking out all areas.  Most of what we observed were too far for decent photos, but for birding we saw a total of 27 species for the morning.  Here is one photo of a perhaps a young, or a female Scissor-tailed Flycatcher.  The tail is quite shorter than normal male adult.

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher

Click on any photo to see enlargements.

Black-chinned Hummingbirds


Going through all of my images yesterday, I came to realize that I haven’t broached the subject of hummingbirds in quite awhile.  So, having that in mind, I thought that today I would post some of my photos of some Black-chinned Hummingbirds (Archilochus alexandri).  The black-chins are the most predominant hummingbird in this area.  We do have some ruby-throats, and I will feature them in the next post in a few days.

Black-chinned Hummingbird - young male

  • Canon EOS 20D
  • Canon 100-400mm zoom lens
  • 1/250 sec. @ f7.1
  • ISO 400
  • Lens focal distance – 400mm
  • Aperture priority
  • Metering – Partial

Black-chinned Hummingbird - female

This little gal was enjoying the mist over the pond at the Hummer House in Christoval, Texas

  • Canon EOS 7D
  • Canon 500mm lens with 1.4 tele-converter – tripod mounted
  • 1/000 sec. @ f5.6
  • ISO 1600
  • Lens focal distance – 700mm
  • Aperture priority
  • Metering – Partial

Black-chinned Hummingbird - male

This guy looks a little angry.  Something has his dander up. 🙂

  • Canon EOS 40D
  • Canon 500mm lens with 1.4 tele-converter – tripod mounted
  • 1/250 sec. @ f6.3
  • ISO 800
  • Lens focal distance –  700mm
  • Aperture priority
  • Metering – Partial

Black-chinned Hummingbird

  • Canon EOS 40D
  • Canon 500mm lens with 1.4 tele-converter – tripod mounted
  • 1/800 sec. @ f5.6
  • ISO 800
  • Lens focal distance – 700mm
  • Aperture priority
  • Metering – Center weighted

Just Singin’ in the Rain


A couple of photographs of a Black-chinned Hummingbird, singing (actually humming) happily in the rain.  They were under a mister and getting pretty wet.

Black-chinned Hummingbird

 

Black-chinned Hummingbird

 

These energetic birds were photographed at Dan and Cathy Brown’s ranch at Christoval, Texas.  I used my Canon 7D with  a 500mm lens and a 1.4 tele-converter.  It was mounted on a Manfrotto tripod with a Wimberley gimbal head.  Shooting distance was about 40 feet.  Click on either image to see and enlargement.