Raptors ‘R’ Us – Part II


Okay, getting back to my chatter about raptors……..  I believe I left off with discussing the Red-tailed Hawks.  I might as well add this photo that I captured a couple days ago, after I published part I.

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Red-tailed Hawk

Another hawk that is similar to the Red-tailed, is the Swainson’s Hawk.  In fact, when I got into birding and was new, I often confused the two.  They are a stately bird.  That dark bib is one of my favorite markers for this specie.

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Swainson’s Hawk

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Swainson’t Hawk

I love watching the Northern Harrier.  Some people refer to him as the Grey Ghost. It hunts by flying low over the grasslands.  It’s eyes seemingly never leave the ground.  I have found them very difficult to photograph, but in truth, I have had few opportunites to do so.  When I do see one, it usually takes me by surprise, as it flies by.  However, I am proud of this photo that I captured on a trip to the Davis Mountains.  I spotted it from my car as it was streaking across the land.  I stopped the car, and caught it as it turned around and made a return flyby.  Not one of my best technically, but I do like the composition.  It is readily identified by that large white spot on it’s rear.

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Northern Harrier on the hunt.

One raptor that is rarely seen here in the Concho Valley is the Crested Caracara.  Sometimes known locally as a Mexican Eagle.  It is more familiar in south and central Texas.  It is a peculiar looking bird, and it sometimes can be seen hanging out with the vultures, eating road-kill along the highways.  I did get a few photos while visiting our friends at Uvalde, Texas.  He is not wearing a toupee.

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Crested Caracara

Another hawk that favors the southern part of the state, is the Harris’s Hawk.  I was able to capture several images of this bird when visiting Uvalde.  It seemed that it was everywhere.  Of course, as usual, I was hunting them from the car.

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Harris’s Hawk

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Harris’s Hawk

There are two hawks that confuse birders and cause great debates about identification of the two.  I am talking about the Cooper’s Hawk and Sharp-shinned Hawk.  They are very similar.  I will offer a photo of each here.  The Cooper’s has the black-cap on a flattish shaped head.  Also the eyes are set forward more.  The Sharp-shinned lacks the black cap and has a more round head shape.  Even then, I imagine that I will get letters disputing my IDs.  I am definitely no expert, but this is my story and I am sticking to it. 🙂

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Cooper’s Hawk.

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Sharp-shinned Hawk

The Red-shouldered is a slightly larger bird.  It is easily identified with that red area on the shoulder.  This one was photographed at the Hummer House Bird Sanctuary in Christoval, Texas.

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Red-shouldered Hawk

The White-tailed Hawk is one that I know very little about.  It usually lives in far southeast Texas.  However, I photographed this one near Uvalde.  A friend helped me with the identification.

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White-tailed Hawk

Before I forget, I must include the Osprey, a fish-eating raptor.

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Osprey

Getting into some of the smaller hawks, I have seen and photographed a Merlin several times at San Angelo State Park.  At only ten inches tall, they still look formidable.  You can see that look of innocence, though.  Here are two of my favorite photos of one.

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Merlin

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Merlin

Ah, my definite favorite of the tiny hawks is the American Kestrel.  Beautiful marking.  A very feisty raptor that can sometimes act benign and easy to photograph, or often as not, give me a merry chase through the countryside.  It depends on his mood.  This particular image is one of the latter.  I was in a mini-van at the time several years ago, driving through San Angelo State Park.  Ann was with me, and this little bird moved from tree to tree, finally stopping and giving me nice views of his tail feathers.

IMG_1000_blog_kestrel

American Kestrel

Finally, I am going to end this raptor series with one of the fastest falcons on the planet.  We were at San Angelo State Park, watching the brush for some warblers, when something flashing by caught my eye.  It zipped past some trees and out of sight with great speed.  I told Ann, I just have to go see if I can see if and where that bird might have  landed.  She started to protest, but I had the keys and was driving.  The effort paid off, as we didn’t go far.  It had landed atop a picnic table shelter.   I was able to get shots from afar, but since it didn’t move, I was able to maneuver in closer with the car.  It continued to sit as I took several photos.  I discovered then that it was a young bird.

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Peregrine Falcon

Here is an adult that I photographed a few years back.

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Peregrine Falcon

This concluded my 2-part series about the raptors of the Texas bird world.  There are a few more species, but as of this date, I have yet to see or photograph.  When I do, you will be the first to know. 🙂

So on this date, December 31, 2017, I want to wish everybody a fantastic Happy New Year and best wishes for a great 2018.

Happy Birding!!!

All in a Day’s Work


Somebody mentioned to me a few days ago, that I was good at making bird photos into a work of art.  I appreciate compliments like that, but it is all in a day’s work.  Some days are a bust when I am out looking for good photos.  On the other hand, when I have great days, it makes it all worth while.  Such was a recent day, when, although the birding was slow, the quality of what little we saw was great.

We were roaming through the local city parks, here in San Angelo.  It was cloudy, even a little foggy when we left the house.  Our first stop was at Spring Creek Park, but there wasn’t much to see.  The birds were in hiding, I guess, because of the dampness.  The fog lifted a bit as were were leaving so we headed to Middle Concho Park.  The skies brightened then although it stayed cloudy.

It made for nice even lighting.  We came upon this Vermilion Flycatcher and he was quite nice to give me some good poses.  It looked like we might have a pretty good day after all.

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Vermilion Flycatcher

This House Wren was in a brushy area near the water.

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House Wren

The most fun of all was seeing this bobcat.  In a large open area outside of the park, we had seen two bobcats from a distance.  Too far for photos, I was disappointed that I wasn’t able to get photographs.  They were both on the run, heading for the brush, so I wouldn’t have been too sucessful anyway.  We were beginning to leave the area, when I happened to look to the left into the brush.  I was thrilled to see this young Bobcat, laying there looking contented, and staring right at me.  It was one of those one-in-a-million chances.  I was about 150 feet away.  I stopped the car, turned off the engine, and proceeded to take as many photos as I wanted.  He didn’t move too much, except for opening and closing his eyes.  I surmise he had just finished a sucessful morning hunt, and was resting.  Anyway, after getting about 50 exposures, I drove away and let him sleep.  As beautiful as he was and I enjoyed watching him, there was nothing to gain by staying.  I hate to disturb or agitate any wildlife.

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Young Bobcat

After leaving that park, we decided to head for home.  However, luck was still with me, and as we rounded a bend in the road, off to the right there was a wetlands area.  In a tree overlooking the water was this beautiful Osprey.  I drove down the road further, copped a U turn, and came back, driving in the weeds on the left side of the road.  I wanted to photograph him from my drivers’ side window.

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Osprey

So, anyway, I love days like that, when I turn a lemon into lemonade.  But I have been busy since my last post, so here are a few more memorable photos that I have gotten since then.

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Lark Bunting

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American White Pelicans at O.C. Fisher Lake

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Black-throated Sparrow

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American Robin – pale adult

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Great Blue Heron

That’s all for this post.  Now, I would like to mention that Christmas is coming so how about checking out my on-line store.  Not only can you get prints of my work in any size, but also home accessories like coffee mugs, tote bags, etc., all featuring my photography.  Click on “Bob’s Gallery”  at top of this page for more information on how to purchase.

Also, I have several of my 2018 calendars left.  They make great stocking stufffers. Click here for info. https://bobzeller.wordpress.com/2017/10/29/my-2018-texas-tweeties-calendar/

Bird activity at Spring Creek Park


The weather has cooled and birding has improved over the past few days.  It is hard to believe that just four days ago on the 18th, San Angelo had a record-breaking high of 97°.  It broke the old record of 92 set back about 100 years ago by five degrees.

So anyway, a few days ago, Ann and I went to Spring Creek to check out the birds there.  What fun we had.  First we came upon a Red-tailed Hawk just as it flew from a tree in front of us.  I quickly watched to see where it landed.  Luck was with us and it landed in a tree about another 150 yards away.  It had it’s back to me and it was back-lit, but I did get this photo as it looked back at us.

Red-tailed Hawk - 1/2000 sec. @ f7.1, ISO 6400.

Red-tailed Hawk – 1/2000 sec. @ f7.1, ISO 6400.

A few minutes later, we saw several Cattle Egrets along the edge of the water.  I got out of the car, and keeping trees between me and the birds I tried to get within camera range.  They were skittish and I only managed to get a photo of this one that was slower than the rest.

Catttle Egret - 1/2000 sec. @ f7.1, ISO 160.

Catttle Egret – 1/2000 sec. @ f7.1, ISO 160.

As we circled through a horseshoe drive portion of the park, we spotted this Vermilion Flycatcher in a smal live oak next to the road.  It was on the opposite side of the car so I couldn’t shoot through the window easily.  I got out of the vehicle, placed my bean-bag on the roof of the car and got a pretty decent image, if I do say so myself.

Vermilion Flycatcher - 1/2000 @ f7.1, -0.3 EV, ISO 160.

Vermilion Flycatcher – 1/2000 @ f7.1, -0.3 EV, ISO 160.

Also along the water, we saw a Spotted Sandpiper hopping along.

Spotted Sandpiper - 1/2000 sec, @ f6,3, -0.3 EV, ISO 320

Spotted Sandpiper – 1/2000 sec, @ f6,3, -0.3 EV, ISO 320.

It is always fun to run across a roadrunner.

Greater Roadrunner - 1/1600 sec. @ f6.3, -0.3 EV, ISO 160.

Greater Roadrunner – 1/1600 sec. @ f6.3, -0.3 EV, ISO 160.

Greater Roadrunner - 1/1600 sec. @ f6.3, -0.3 EV, ISO 160.

Greater Roadrunner – 1/1600 sec. @ f6.3, -0.3 EV, ISO 160.

After leaving the park, we saw this Osprey looking out over the water, hoping to see an early lunch.

Osprey - 1/1000 sec. @ f6.3, -0.3, ISO 1000.

Osprey – 1/1000 sec. @ f6.3, -0.3, ISO 1000.

After having so much fun that day, we decided to return the following day.  Immediately, we saw a Great Blue Heron in the water.  I liked it’s pose and as I turned the car to get a good shooting angle, a large Osprey flew down and scared the heron off.  The Osprey decided to stay awhile and stayed in the water where the heron had stood.  It apparently like the water temperature so it decided to bathe and get itself clean.  It flopped around, shook it’s wings, dove under the water for an instant than shook itself dry again.  It repeated this several times.

Osprey - 1/1000 sec. @ f7.1, -0.3, ISO 320

Osprey – 1/1000 sec. @ f7.1, -0.3 EV, ISO 320

Osprey - 1/2000 sec. @ f6.3, - 0.3 EV, ISO 1000.

Osprey – 1/2000 sec. @ f6.3, – 0.3 EV, ISO 1000.

Osprey - 1/1000 sec. @ f7.1, -0.3 EV, ISO 250.

Osprey – 1/1000 sec. @ f7.1, -0.3 EV, ISO 250.

Finally, it took off and landed a few yards away to dry off.

Osprey - 1/2000 sec. @ f7.1, -0.3 EV, ISO 800.

Osprey – 1/2000 sec. @ f7.1, -0.3 EV, ISO 800.

This whole sequence took place about 150 yards away from my camera position.  In retrospect, I wish I had videoed the whole time.  But I didn’t want to take a chance of missing the whole thing, while trying to set up my camera for recording.  I ended up with about 150 different exposures, and perhaps after reviewing all of them, I may find some more interesting images.

Meanwhile, up in the trees away from the water, this Great Horned Owl slept through the excitement.

Great Horned Owl - 1/2000 sec. @ f6.3, +0.7 EV, ISO 6400.

Great Horned Owl – 1/2000 sec. @ f6.3, +0.7 EV, ISO 6400.

We ended our little foray into Spring Creek Park by getting an image of one of my favorite birds, the Scissor-tailed Flycatcher.

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 1/2000 sec. @ f7.1, ISO 250.

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher – 1/2000 sec. @ f7.1, ISO 250.

I hoped you enjoyed this post.  Click on any image to see some amazing enlargements.

 

‘Til the next time, Happy Birding!!

 

Photos and a DVD update.


Still pretty warm (hot) here and we are not getting out much.  The birds are laying pretty low, so I am getting caught up, going through old images, and resurrecting some.  Here is one that I came across that I captured in February and never before published to this blog.  Probably one of my favorites of a Northern Bobwhite.

Northern Bobwhite

Northern Bobwhite

Another February photo of a Black-crested Titmouse.

Black-crested Titmouse

Black-crested Titmouse

From April, an Osprey.

Osprey

Osprey

Recently, driving in the heat through Mary Lee Park here in San Angelo, I discovered that the Prairie Dogs are expanding there range away from the nature center there.  This little guy was eyeing me carefully as I drove by.

Black-tailed Prairie Dog

Black-tailed Prairie Dog

Click any image to see some great enlargements.

DVD UPDATE:

My new “World of Bob Zeller – Outdoor Photographer” DVDs are here. Outstanding collection with great sound track. 100 of my best images. Better than my book. Produced by DSTappan Productions of Knoxville, Tennessee. Price is 25.00 that includes Texas tax and shipping. Local San Angelo residents only 20.00 if I can deliver it to you. I do business the old-fashioned way, just a handshake. You mail me a check to: Bob Zeller, 4401 White Ash Ln., San Angelo, TX 76904-4528, and I will get one shipped to you. Also, my phone is 325-944-1839 and my e-mail is bobzeller@pobox.com.  I have many references as to my honesty if you are interested.

That’s all for now.  Happy Birding!!

 

Is Spring here yet?


Over the past few days Ann and I have made a few trips to the local parks to check for incoming migrants.  It’s probably a little early but what the heck, it keeps us off the couch.  Having said that, though, we saw our first of the year American Robin.  Is that a harbinger of spring or what?

American Robin

American Robin

This bird isn’t the one we saw yesterday as I failed to get a decent shot.  This photo was taken last year.  But here are a few images that we did get during the past few days.

Greater White-fronted Goose

Greater White-fronted Goose

Getting the Greater White-fronted Goose was a nice find, and an addition to our 2015 Big Year list.  This goose is rare around here, not appearing every year.

Great Blue Heron

Great Blue Heron

Great Blue Herons are in great supply as they are year-round residents.  This one was just strolling, perhaps trolling, but I didn’t see him make any move towards catching anything.

Great Horned Owl

Great Horned Owl

Now this Great Horned Owl was wide awake.  Check out those eyes.  He was eye-balling everyone that came along, including me, but he didn’t mine me taking a few photographs.

Northern Cardinal

Northern Cardinal

The Northern Cardinal, eyed me up and down, then gave me a nice Howdy-do as I went by.

Eared Grebe

Eared Grebe

An Eared Grebe enjoyed himself swimming along.  This was only the second sighting of one this winter…….or is it spring?

Osprey

Osprey

The Osprey, one of my favorite raptors didn’t look like he was doing any hunting.  Perched about 20 feet above the water he was content to just stare off into the distance.

The following two images are of a Double-crested Cormorant.  This is the first time that I ever saw the two crests that the the bird is named for.  They are only visible during spring months, then not always.

Double-crested Cormorant

Double-crested Cormorant

Double-crested Cormorant

Double-crested Cormorant

So that is all for today.  I will be hunting again the next few days and I wonder what that will bring.  Click on any of these images to see some nice enlargements.

‘T’was the day after New Year’s Day


Today, January 2, was gloomy, freezing, icy, wet, and all that goes with it.  We woke up – again- with everything covered with a coat of ice.  Another day of staying in.  Right??  Wrong.  Hey, we’re birders and we always find a way.  We were anxious to get started on our Big Year 2015 list.

After sitting around all morning trying to stay warm, we decided that we could stay warm in the car.  The streets and roads were not in bad shape as long as we stayed off the high-speed loop and avoided icy bridges.

Osprey - note ice-covered branches.

Osprey – note ice-covered branches.

We waited until about 1:15 and decided to wend our way to the local parks around Lake Nasworthy to see what we could from the car.  We didn’t figure that we would see much.  A very light freezing drizzle accompanied us throughout.  The temperature was steady at 34 degrees F.  I kept the windshield wipers on very slow and we drove slowly through the ice-covered environment.

Surprisingly, we did see a good variety of birds, including the Osprey pictured above.  We avoided driving through the soft mushy ground along the fence lines so we didn’t see any of the small kinglets or wrens that may have been there.

Western Meadowlark

Western Meadowlark

There were several grackles, starlings and meadowlarks on the ground.  In the water there was an abundance of Double-crested and a few Neotropic Cormorants.  Frankly, I was surprised to see the Neotropics here this time of year.

We spooked a Red-tailed Hawk from a tree just above the car.  I failed to see him in time to get a photo.  A few Great Blue Herons and Great Egrets made their way through the gloom.  The lighting was definitely the best for photography, not to mention the mist that I tried to stay from the camera.

We drove through the dampness for about three hours and netted 27 species for the day.  It was actually quite fun.  We were cozy in the car, only opening the windows for closer looks, the closing them again.

So we are off and running for the year.  Now to finish up this post, get some sleep and go again tomorrow morning……after an hour of so to get thing thawed again.

Again, you will be able to follow our Big Year progress by clicking on my Big Year 2015 page above.

Thanksgiving Birding


Ann and I are thankful that, at our age, we can still get out and enjoy the outdoors and wildlife.  That said, we have no encumberments, no close relatives, so we are free to do as we please regardless of what the calendar says.  Besides, I wanted to play some more with my new Canon EOS 7D Mark II.  So, a few days this week, including Thanksgiving morning, we got out and did what we love to do best.  Here are a few highlights from those outings earlier this week.  Enjoy.

Osprey on Monday

Osprey on Monday

Golden-fronted Woodpecker

Golden-fronted Woodpecker

Great Egret

Great Egret

Great Egret

Great Egret

Mr. and Mrs. Hooded Merganser

Mr. and Mrs. Hooded Merganser

Black-crowned Night Heron

Black-crowned Night Heron

Black-crowned Night Heron

Black-crowned Night Heron

Osprey on Thanksgiving Day.  He loves this spot to do his hunting.

Osprey on Thanksgiving Day. He loves this spot to do his hunting.

We saw many bird species, averaging about 30-35 each day.  However, most photos were not display materiel.  Just grab shots for ID, etc.

We added one more to our 2014 Big Year list.  A Forster’s Tern a Lake Nasworthy.  We are now at 198 in our goal to get to 200 by December 31.  However, we are heading to the Davis Mountains area in two weeks so hopefully can get those two that we need out there.

The Surprises Keep Coming……


After getting that amazing photo of the Bobcat, I was pretty sure that I wouldn’t be so lucky again for awhile.  However, the following day, Ann and I decided to go back for some serious birding.  We were very disappointed with the lack of birds.  Hey, isn’t this migrating time?  Where are the birds?  Hard to say, as I sure can’t predict the behavior of the avian community.

Anyway, on the way to Middle Concho Park, I decided to turn into a smaller area called Hot Water Slough Park.  The first thing I noticed was a large bird on the ground, and as we watched it flew up into a nearby tree.  Well, I’ll be danged if it wasn’t a Swainson’s Hawk.  I hurriedly tried to maneuver my car into a position so I could photograph it from my driver’s side window.  The bird co-operated and remained perched for me.  Had I tried to leave my vehicle, it would for sure have flown.

Swainson's Hawk

Swainson’s Hawk

We continued into Middle Concho Park, but nary was a bird to be seen.  We left there and decided to return to Spring Creek Park.  Again, there was a distinct lack of birds there, too.  However, we are pretty patient.  We cruised along the river bank and all of a sudden, Ann exclaimed, “There’s an owl”.  Wow!  It was a Great Horned Owl, and almost directly overhead.  As I again tried to maneuver my car for a vantage point, she said, “There’s another one!”  Sure enough, above and slightly left was another adult, but it was partially hidden in the branches.  I was able to get some nice shots of the first one.

Great Horned Owl

Great Horned Owl

So even though there were few of the regular birds that make up the normal population, it was nice to see these nice surprises.

The very next day, we tried again.  Again, we were rewarded with another great surprise.  As we turned into Spring Creek Park, we came upon a large dead tree next to the river bank.  In past years, we had seen hawks, and other birds perched there, but usually it is empty of any bird life.  This time there was an Osprey sitting there.  One of the first of the winter season.  It was very close, as I again, was able to get my car into perfect shooting position.  The first image is from a spot where he was un-obstructed by branches.

Osprey

Osprey

After getting several shots from that spot, I moved a few yards and took the following photo.  Notice he is on the same branch, but I think this image looks a bit more natural.  I am undecided as to which one I like the best.

Osprey

Osprey

I hope you enjoyed this post and the photos.  There is a lesson to be heard here;  never give up as you never know what surprises may lie in the next tree.

Just a few images from the past week.


This post might be a bit brief from the narrative side.  I couldn’t think of anything to write about more deeply.  We did make a few excursions this past week to do a bit of birding, and get a few photographs along the way.  We did see our first Bullock’s Oriole and Scissor-tailed Flycatchers of the year.  Also the first Black-necked Stilts that we have seen in over two years.  With the level of Lake Nasworthy having dropped three feet, the shoreline is wider and making great habitat for the wading shorebirds.  Here are a few photos for you to see.  I would strongly ask that you read this post by clicking on the link.  Then you can click the images and see some great enlargements.

Osprey

Osprey

I watched the Osprey for twenty minutes, hoping he would turn to face me a me a little bit, but it never happened.

Eastern Bluebird

Eastern Bluebird

The Eastern Bluebird was in the shade a little bit, almost making the face too dark, but I love photographing them.

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher

The Scissor-tailed Flycatcher was a harbinger of many more to come.  Summer is almost upon us.

Eastern Phoebe

Eastern Phoebe

Spotted Sandpiper

Solitary Sandpiper

Black-necked Stilt

Black-necked Stilt

I love the elegant, gracefulness of these Black-necked Stilts.  Their slender legs are about the size of straws.

Bullock's Oriole

Bullock’s Oriole

The Bullock’s Oriole is the predominant oriole in this area.  The one above was the first I saw this spring.  It was nearly too far away for a decent photo.

Great Horned Owlets

Great Horned Owlets

The owlets were over two hundred yards away, across the lake, high in a tree.  My friend, Julie Stewart, told me about them.  She attempted to photograph them with her 300mm lens, but were almost out of reach.  She thought that with my 150-600mm lens I might have a better chance.  I got the above shot, putting my setup on a tripod at the water’s edge.  Even then, I had to do some extreme cropping, and a little sharpening.  Those tiny twigs in front of the birds made focusing from that distance very difficult.  But thank you, Julie, for giving me the chance.

So, that’s about it for this time.  I love reading your comments, so if you feel like saying a few words, give it a go below.

By the way, the Solitary Sandpiper is number 140 on my Texas Big Year list.

It’s all about the light…..


I have a love/hate relationship with the sun sometimes.  I love to be out in the bright sunshine, just enjoying the day.  Then I pick up the camera, and ugh, there are those nasty, harsh shadows.  You have a subject in the viewfinder, one side in shadow, the other in the bright light.  What to do.  The only thing to do is to work with it in the darkroom (digital), and hope to correct it a little.

But then, there are days like today.  It was bright, but there was a very high, thin cloudiness that diffused the sun.  Harsh shadows were at a minimum, and the light was spread more even.

Ann and I overslept this morning for some reason or other.  Perhaps we are getting old, and enjoying our sleep more.  Whatever the reason or cause, we hurried to breakfast at Stango’s Coffee Shop, finished a Scrabble game while we ate, then decided it would be a great day for the camera.

We headed towards Middle Concho and Spring Creek Parks in anticipation of seeing a few birds, (of course) and getting some nice photos.  As I have been doing lately, I attached only my Tamron 150-600mm zoom to my Canon EOS 70D.  The waters of the rivers and creeks have dropped by a vertical distance of about 30 inches in the past few weeks.  Lack of rain will do that.  We have received only .08 (that’s eight one-hundredths of an inch, or less than a tenth) to date this year.

Fortunately, the birds have faith, and are still hanging around.  We saw 37 species.  One was this beautiful juvenile Red-tailed Hawk soaring over out heads.

Red-tailed Hawk

Red-tailed Hawk

We saw a few other species, such as  Spotted Towhee, but it was too elusive to get a good photo.  I will be back for another try.  I know where it lives.  As were were to enter Spring Creek Park, we spotted this beautiful Osprey atop a utility pole.  I pulled over onto the grass a hundred yards away, and walked back through the trees to get a good vantage point for a photo.  I got a nice image of it.

Osprey

Osprey

After entering that park, we first searched for the Great Horned Owl that we have seen in the past.  It was nowhere to be found, but we saw this Great Blue Heron across the river.  I still have trouble resisting photographing them, and this time was no different.

Great Blue Heron

Great Blue Heron

Farther along was this Ladder-backed Woodpecker.

Ladder-backed Woodpecker - female

Ladder-backed Woodpecker – female

Then along the shore of the water, a Killdeer.

Killdeer

Killdeer

I hope you enjoy the highlights of this enjoyable day.  Please click on the images to see some beautiful enlargements.

2014 Big Year total update:

#118  Orange-crowned Warbler

#119  Grasshopper Sparrow

#120  Snowy Egret

#121  Ash-throated Flycatcher