Check my New Gallery Page


Hi there everyone.  I am always trying to think of ways to improve this blog.  I think you will really enjoy my new Gallery page.  Just click the Gallery button at the top of this page, or click here.  The photographs are stunning.  You can scroll and scroll and scroll.  I will keep adding to them almost daily as I try to get all of my photos in it.   Try it out.

In other news, the weather has been nice here again,   The storms have passed and the dog days of summer have set in.  I haven’t been out as much as usual lately, though.  As I mentioned, I have been working on setting up my gallery page.  Also, I am putting together a collection of photos that I will present on a local television show on June 29.  It is called Concho Valley Live, a 30-minute show that airs daily on KLST at 4:00PM during the week.  They have asked me to appear on their June 29 show. (write that down.)  I hope my San Angelo area readers will tune in.  KLST is a CBS affiliate.

Hear are some photos from the past week or so that I managed to get.  Click one any of them to see enlargements.

The Bell’s Vireo was flying between a couple of trees.  He had a companion, and they were chasing each other around.  Finally one of them perched long enough to allow me to get this photo.

Bell’s Vireo.

It seems that even though were traveling all over the San Angelo State Park, we were never away from hearing one or more Northern Bobwhites.  I managed to find this one in a tree.

Northern Bobwhite

The Scissor-tailed Flycatchers are now set in for the summer.  This is another from San Angelo State Park.

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher

More from the Davis Mountains


I have been spending the past several days, catching up with editing my photos from our Davis Mountains birding trip.  I am really thrilled and happy that I was able to get these photographs, some of which have been on my bucket list for a long time.  Oh, I had seen most of the birds in the past, I just hadn’t been able to get the photos of them that I was satisfied with.  Anyway, here is anoatherhalf-dozen that I have ready for you.  All of them were captureded in or near the Davis Mountains of west Texas.  Click on an of them to see enlargements.

One of my favorites of the trip was this Acorn Woodpecker.  I love their clown face.  They are seen mostly in the mountains of far west Texas and southern Arizona.

Acorn Woodpecker

Formerly the Western Scrub-Jay.  It was split into different species, the Woodhouse’s Scrub-Jay and the California Scrub-Jay.

Woodhouse’s Scrub-Jay

The beautiful Scott’s Oriole is found mostly in west Texas, New Mexico and Arizona.

Scott’s Oriole

This Western Tanager was pretty elusive.  He stayed partly hidden in the branches, until he finally made this brief appearance.

Western Tanager

The Loggerhead Shrike is a familiar bird all across the southern states.  Know as the Butcher Bird as he likes to impale his prey on barbed-wire or cactus spines, to be eaten at a later time.

Loggerhead Shrike

Another photo of the Woodhouse’s Scrub’Jay.  I don’t know which I like best.

Woodhouse’s Scrub-Jay

Again, I hope you enjoyed these photos.  More are coming in future posts.  Prints are available at my FineArtAmerican store at: http://1bob-zeller.pixels.com.  Just click on the image you are interested in and a menu will fall in place, letting you know what is available and pricing.  You may also buy 12×16 prints directly from me at bobzeller@pobox.com.

One of my readers, Mr. Carl White, asked for a list of all of the species from that trip.  So for all of you birders who may be curious, here is what we saw from leaving San Angelo on May 1 until coming back on May 5.  It includes birds from the Davis Mountains, Lake Balmorhea, Saucedo Wetlands, and highways throughout the areas.

  1. Pyrhuloxia
  2. White-winged Dove
  3. Turkey Vulture
  4. Common Raven
  5. Scissor-tailed Flycatcher
  6. Northern Mockingbird
  7. Bullock’s Oriole
  8. House Finch
  9. House Sparrow
  10. Great-tailed Grackle
  11. Cassin’s Kingbird
  12. White-crowned Sparrow
  13. Greater Roadrunner
  14. Northern Shoveler
  15. Cinnamon Teal
  16. Mallard
  17. Killdeer
  18. Cave Swallow
  19. Western Meadowlark
  20. Purple Martin
  21. American Coot
  22. Pied-billed Grebe
  23. Olive-sided Sparrow
  24. Black-chinned Hummingbird
  25. Brown-headed Cowbird
  26. Red-tailed Hawk
  27. Chichuahuan Raven
  28. Lark Sparrow
  29. Woodhouse’s Scrub-Jay
  30. Scott’s Oriole
  31. White-breasted Nuthatch
  32. Swainson’s Hawk
  33. Chipping Sparrow
  34. Black-headed Grosbeak
  35. Acorn Woodpecker
  36. Mourning Dove
  37. Wilson’s Warbler
  38. Black-crested Titmouse
  39. Hermit Thrush
  40. Western Wood-Pewee
  41. Summer Tanager
  42. Pine Siskin
  43. Blue Grosbeak
  44. Montezuma Quail
  45. Cactus Wren
  46. Canyon Towhee
  47. Say’s Phoebe
  48. McGilivray’s Warbler
  49. Bushtit
  50. Common Nighthawk
  51. Hepatic Tanager (lifer)
  52. Yellow-rumped Warbler
  53. Bewick’s Wren
  54. Western Tanager
  55. Loggerhead Shrike
  56. Scaled Quail
  57. Common Black-Hawk
  58. Eastern Meadowlark
  59. Ladder-backed Woodpecker
  60. Lesser Goldfinch
  61. Northern Cardinal
  62. Black-throated Sparrow
  63. Spotted Sandpiper
  64. Green Heron
  65. Red-winged Blackbird
  66. Western Grebe
  67. Clark’s Grebe
  68. Black-necked Stilt
  69. White-faced Ibis
  70. Snowy Egret
  71. Yellow-headed Blackbird
  72. Vermilion Flycatcher
  73. Curve-billed Thrasher
  74. Western Kingbird

Say it isn’t so, Bob, say it isn’t so…….


Well sorry to say, it is so.  I am suspending my blog, at least for a short period.  You might say I am taking a sabbatical for several weeks, perhaps a couple of months.  I am undergoing a series of procedures to cure some skin cancer on my face and neck.  I am hoping to get back to work by the end of April, as Ann and I want to spend a few days in the Davis Mountains during the first week of May.

Because of this, I obviously need to keep myself out of the sun as much as possible.  My face looks like it has been run over by a garbage truck with a full load.  It is very uncomfortable, and that makes it hard for me to concentrate on anything to do with writing creatively.  I do hope to get outdoors anyway, perhaps earlier in the day, or when it is cloudier.  I am not fit right now to be seen in public.  But in the end, it will be worth the discomfort.

Anyway, to ease your disappointment, I have a few images from the past couple of weeks that I will show you here.  Click on any photo to see an enlargement.

Burrowing Owl

American Kestrel

Ruby-crowned Kinglet

Carolina Wren

Red-breasted Nuthatch

Red-winged Blackbird – female

American Robin in early morning light.

Horned Lark

Osprey, with lunch

Red-tailed Hawk

Great Horned Owl – peeking from behind a freshly cut branch.

So there you have it, something to hold you over for a few weeks.  See ya then….

Happy Birding.

A Pre-Valentine’s Day Post


I am getting back into my routine since returning from the Big Bend.  The weather is moving up and down like a Disney roller-coaster.  93° last Saturday.  Maybe 45° today.  No matter, I try to get out for an hour or two, or three nearly every day.  The birding is improving, but having said that, it will probably be another wait for the spring birds to arrive.  But let me show you the photos I have gotten since my last post.  As usual, click on any image to see some nice enlargements.

Here in San Angelo we do have American Robins pretty regularly, but this year it seems there many, many more than in the past.  I see them almost everywhere I go.

American Robin - 1/640 sec. @ f6.3, +0,7 EV, ISO 3200, 450mm

American Robin – 1/640 sec. @ f6.3, +0,7 EV, ISO 3200, 450mm

This House Finch and the above robin were photographed early in the morning at the same darkish location, which accounted for the high ISO of 3200.  As you can see, they are sitting on the same branch.

House Finch, female - 1/500 sec. @ f6.3, +0,7 EV, ISO 3200, 550mm.

House Finch, female – 1/500 sec. @ f6.3, +0,7 EV, ISO 3200, 550mm.

I love to photograph the Northern Cardinals.  They are so photogenic, it is hard to get a bad image.

Northern Cardinal - 1/500 sec. @ f6.3, +0.7 EV, ISO 3200, 450mm

Northern Cardinal – 1/500 sec. @ f6.3, +0.7 EV, ISO 3200, 450mm

Loggerhead Shrike, AKA ‘the butcherbird’.  They love to impale their prey on a thorn or barbed wire before consuming them.

Loggerhead Shrike - 1/640 sec. @ f8, +0.7 EV, ISO 200, 600mm.

Loggerhead Shrike – 1/640 sec. @ f8, +0.7 EV, ISO 200, 600mm.

The Belted Kingfishers are not innocent either.  They dive and hit the water at about 100MPH, stabbing their fish, and giving themselves a nasty headache.

Belted Kingfisher, female. 1/640 sec. @ f7.1, +0.7 EV, ISO 400, 600mm.

Belted Kingfisher, female. 1/640 sec. @ f7.1, +0.7 EV, ISO 400, 600mm.

This Carolina Wren gave me a nice pose early one morning.

Carolina Wren - 1/1000 sec. @ f6.3, +0.3 EV, ISO 640, 600mm.

Carolina Wren – 1/1000 sec. @ f6.3, +0.3 EV, ISO 640, 600mm.

Last week one day, we ventured out to about a dozen miles west of Eldorado, where this Burrowing Owl was making it’s home in a culvert.  When we arrived, we saw from about 100 yards down the road.  He was standing looking our way, like he was waiting for us to show up.  As we neared he jumped into the culvert, and turned and peeked out to look our way.  Of about 100 images this was one of my personal favorites.  My camera and lens gave me an excellent quality file to work with, and I was able to crop close and give you this portrait.

Burrowing Owl - 1/1600 sec. @ f7.1, ISO 400, 600mm.

Burrowing Owl – 1/1600 sec. @ f7.1, ISO 400, 600mm.

One day at San Angelo State Park ann spotted this Merlin off to the right of the car.  I only had time to shoot across Ann’s lap through her window.  The early morning gave me some good light.

Merlin - 1/2000 sec. @ f6.3, +0.7 EV, ISO 1000, 600mm.

Merlin – 1/2000 sec. @ f6.3, +0.7 EV, ISO 1000, 600mm.

Before we left the state park, we spotted this Red-tailed Hawk perched.  As I was starting to shoot, from about80 yards away, it decided to take flight.  I was ready, and I filled the frame with my lens.

Red-tailed Hawk - 1/2000 sec. @ f6.3, ISO 320, 600mm.

Red-tailed Hawk – 1/2000 sec. @ f6.3, ISO 320, 600mm.

I hope you enjoyed this post and all of the photographs.  I am working on adding images to my FineArtamerica store where you can buy prints and other items with my photography.

You may want to start a collection of my coffee mugs with birds or some of my landscape images.  They make fine gifts.  To browse and/or purchase, Click HERE.

On the Road Again…….


As we do each year at this time, we get to thinking about traveling.  So, next Monday, January 30, we are going to make another trip out to the Big Bend area of Texas.  Essentially, it will be to Big Bend National Park, but we will also be taking in some of the surrounding sights.  We’ll see the ghost town of Terlingua, parts of the huge Big Bend Ranch State Park, and travel one of the most scenic drives in the country: the El Camino Del Rio, (the river road) from Lajitas to Presidio, Texas.  We will have four days of scenic photography and birding.  I should come home with plenty of material for a future blog post.

Of course, most of you know that we have already made numerous trips to that area.  Sometimes, we go to the Davis Mountains, which lies just north of our current destination.  I am sure we will be returning there in a few months, too.  But, this time, we will be staying again at the Casitas at Far Flung Outdoor Center, located in Study Butte, just down the highway from the ghost town.

Our birding destinations will be in Big Bend National Park.  Favorite spots include the Sam Nail Ranch, Cottonwood Campground, Rio Grand Village RV campground, Dugout Wells and the Chisos Mountains.  We hope to add many birds to our 2017 list.  Our goal again is 210.  To date we are at 100 even.

Here are a few more photographs more photos that I have captured this month.  Click any image to see an enlargement.

I photographed this Osprey on New Year’s Day.  A nice way to start the year.

Osprey - 1/1250 @ f6.3, _0.3 EV, ISO 1000

Osprey – 1/1250 @ f6.3, _0.3 EV, ISO 1000

The Common Yellowthroat is a shy, tiny, elusive, colorful little bird that likes to hangout in swampy reeds, etc.  He only makes an appearance whenever he darned well pleases, and that is not very often.  It took Ann and I several mornings, of getting to the location where was last sighted, then just watched and waited.  When he showed I was ready and he was out for only about one minute, then he was back in his hidey-hole once again.

Common Yellowthroat - 1/800 sec. @ f6.3, +0.3 EV, ISO 400.

Common Yellowthroat – 1/800 sec. @ f6.3, +0.3 EV, ISO 400.

I believe I photographed this Vesper Sparrow at San Angelo State Park.

Vesper Sparrow - 1/640 sec. @ f6.3, +0.3 EV, ISO 500

Vesper Sparrow – 1/640 sec. @ f6.3, +0.3 EV, ISO 500

Just before the entrance to Middle Concho Park, there is a small pond surround by cattails and reeds.  Most of the time it is empty of birds, save an occasional heron, but this time there was a male and female Hooded Merganzer swimming casually around.

Hooded Merganzer - 1/1000 sec. @ f7.1, -0.3 EV, ISO 250.

Hooded Merganzer – 1/1000 sec. @ f7.1, -0.3 EV, ISO 250.

The female is a pretty little thing, too.

Hooded Merganzer - female - 1/2000 sec. @ f6.3 -0,3 EV, ISO 200.

Hooded Merganzer – female – 1/2000 sec. @ f6.3 -0,3 EV, ISO 200.

This Fox Sparrow dropped by for a drink from a puddle of water in Spring Creek Park.

Fox Sparrow - 1/800 sec. @ f6.3, -0.3 EV, ISO 250.

Fox Sparrow – 1/800 sec. @ f6.3, -0.3 EV, ISO 250.

The wind was getting up a little when I photographed this Great Egret, just hanging out.

Great Egret - 1/1250 sec. @ f7.1, +0.7 EV, ISO 400

Great Egret – 1/1250 sec. @ f7.1, +0.7 EV, ISO 400

I do believe that is it for this post.  It is most likely my last until I return from our vacation and February 3, unless I can squeeze a little quicky before we leave.  But I will mention, as it nears Valentine’s day, I would appreciate it if you would consider the many gifts in my (click) FineArtAmerica store.  If you love my photography, whether it be birds, beautiful landscapes or flowers check it out, you can find decor, useful items, or photographic prints.  You can also click the link under Bob’s Galleries in the sidebar.  Thank you.

Birding Report and new promotion.


My birding report is not good today.  I have been unable to get out and do much photography, because of inclement weather the early part of the week.  Then I spent two days hospitalized because of a minor complication.  Then another day of recuperating.  I am fine now, thank you.  For your enjoyment have a look at this Cooper’s Hawk from my archives.

Cooper's Hawk

Cooper’s Hawk – 1/500 sec. @ f6.e, -0.3 EV, ISO 5000.

Hopefully between now and my next post, I will be more successful to getting out to do some photography.  The weather is improving so things look favorable.

Now let me mention my new promotion. But first, I would like to thank Doc and C.J, of Brownwood for purchasing the 16×20 stretched canvas print of the Painted Rocks that was promoted the past week.  They sent me this comment about their experience:

“Just wanted to let you know we received our print of “Painted Rocks” today! We love it! Texas archaeology is one of our favorite interests and the Painted Rocks are especially near and dear to our hearts. Fine Art America really was a joy to deal with and they got our print to us super fast! Thank you Bob for creating such a special piece of artwork, we’ll be getting it framed soon and will cherish it for many years to come!” 

Click here: FineArtAmerica to see my new promotion.  It features my award-winning image from the International Water Lily Collection in San Angelo.  You will discover that I shoot more than birds.  I hope you will check it out and enjoy.  Prints of all of my work are available.

Until the next time, Happy Birding!! and happy shooting with your camera.

 

Burrowing Owl and other stuff.


Drizzly, chilly and over-all a gray day.  So it is a good day to get caught up on my blog.  We have been getting out pretty regular so I did get some new photos to post.  The highlight of the week was getting to see a Burrowing Owl.  A friend had spotted one a few miles west of Eldorado.  He gave us directions and we drove down on Thursday to see if we could locate it.  Sure, enough, it was where he said it would be.  We had difficulty seeing him a first as he was behind a road culvert, just peeking his head over to see what we were up to.  Here is my first image.  Click on it and the following photos to see enlargements.

Burrowing Owl peeking at me.

Burrowing Owl peeking at me.

We stayed in the car, using it as a blind. I was only about twenty feet away.  The owl eventually started exposing himself so I could get more photographs.

Burrowing Owl

Burrowing Owl

The last one may be my favorite, although I took many photographs, about one hundred.  It was hard to resist.

Burrowing Owl

Burrowing Owl

Now for the other ‘stuff’.  Back here in town, at Spring Creek Park.  Again, we were out there early, with our coffee and burritos.  This Orange-crowned Warbler was one of the first to make an appearance.

Orange-crowned Warbler. 1/640 sec. @ f6.3, +0.7 EV, ISO 6400.

Orange-crowned Warbler. 1/640 sec. @ f6.3, +0.7 EV, ISO 6400.

Then a Fox Sparrow.

Fox Sparrow - 1/1000 sec. @ f7.1, +0.3, ISO 1600

Fox Sparrow – 1/1000 sec. @ f7.1, +0.3, ISO 1600

Back down by the water, this Marsh Wren emerged from the reeds.

Marsh Wren - 1/640 sec. @ f6.3, +0.7 EV, ISO 3200.

Marsh Wren – 1/640 sec. @ f6.3, +0.7 EV, ISO 3200.

A few minutes later, the shy, elusive Common Yellowthroat decided to let himself be seen.  It is such a cute little bird, only about three inches long.

Common Yellowthroat - 1/500 sec. @ f6.3, +0.3 EV, ISO 3200.

Common Yellowthroat – 1/500 sec. @ f6.3, +0.3 EV, ISO 3200.

That’s about it for the photos this week.  You can buy prints and other merchandise featuring my photography here at FineArtAmerica.  Or click the link under my Galleries in the right side of this page.  I have added the photograph of the Burrowing Owl.  Available in many of the gifts, including a nice coffee mug.  Just click on the image you like, and a menu will appear with a list items for purchase.  I would certainly appreciate your business.  If you have any questions, e-mail me at bobzeller@pobox.com.