Let’s blog for another year.


In my previous post I mentioned that it was the seven year anniversary of this blog.  After much soul-searching, horn-blowing, champagne-drinkin’ and general partying, I have decided to go for another year.  Or at least make it until my 1000th post, which this one is my 927th.  Or which comes first.  We will whoop it up then and make another decision if need be.

The birding is still a bit slow, considering the time of the year.  I guess it is because of the continuing high temperatures here in San Angelo.  I think the summer birds got tired of the heat and left town.  Their replacements, the fall and winter birds, decided to delay their visit because it is still darned hot here.

But, we still get out several days a week, hoping to get to see something new or get good photos of any hangers-on.  Here are a few recent images that I am proud of.  I was using my Canon EOS 7D Mark II.  Lens was my Tamron 150-600mm.  I will begin to try to put my exposure data under each photo.  It is something new that I thought I would try.  Several of my readers say that they would like to know how I shoot my photographs.

We stopped near a shrubby area at the Isabelle Harte Multi-use area of San Angelo State Park.  We spotted some bird activity within, and after waiting a few minutes, this Yellow Warbler came out of the branches into view.  It was early in the morning, and the bird was backlit, thus the reason of the one stop EV adjustment.

Yellow Warbler - 1/1000th sec. @f7.1, +1 EV, ISO 1000.

Yellow Warbler – 1/1000th sec. @f7.1, +1 EV, ISO 1000.

This bobwhite was about 30 yards away, partially backlit and shaded by some tree branches.

Northern Bobwhite - 1/1000 sec. @ f7.1, +1 EV adjustment, ISO 1000.

Northern Bobwhite – 1/1000 sec. @ f7.1, +1 EV, ISO 1000.

This Vermilion Flycatcher was high atop a tree branch, pretty far off, but my Tamron 150-600 long lens helped me out.

Vermilion Flycatcher - 1/1000 sec. @ f6.3, ISO 160.

Vermilion Flycatcher – 1/1000 sec. @ f6.3, ISO 160.

There are still several Scissor-tailed Flycatchers in San Angelo State Park.  Most of them we have found lately are the short-tailed juveniles, but we did come upon this adult.  One of my favorite birds.

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 1/1000 sec. @ f7.1, ISO 250.

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher – 1/1000 sec. @ f7.1, ISO 250.

This morning we heard, before we saw it, this Cactus Wren.  Very rare for me to get so close to one.  Another one that was heavily backlit by the morning sun.

Cactus Wren - 1/640 sec. @ f6.3, +1.7 EV, ISO 320.

Cactus Wren – 1/640 sec. @ f6.3, +1.7 EV, ISO 320.

I hope you enjoy my post today.  I would love to hear your questions or comments, so let’s hear what you have to say.

Happy Birding!!


 

Recent Odds and Ends…..


The weather is continuing to be warm, read very warm, and the birds continue to be stressed and they keep to themselves hidden somewhere in the trees and landscape.  However, that doesn’t stop Ann and I from getting out a couple of hours each morning.  Although not getting many images, I have lucked out and got a few nice ones.  Here is a collection, mostly from the past several months that I believe that I may not have ever posted here.  Some may be even older.  My Facebook readers will probably recognize many of them.  If you can, PLEASE view this on a computer.  That way if you click on any image, you can see some very beautiful enlargements.

This Painted Bunting we found at an old mudhole that was on the verge of drying up.  If I were to go there this morning, I am sure it would be dry.  Anyway, I think this is one of my favorite photos of this bird, and I think it is a great start to this blog post.

Painted Bunting

Painted Bunting

This Greater Roadrunner that I photographed yesterday at San Angelo State Park ranks as one of my best of that species.  I love the way the light enhanced the various colors of the feathers.

Greater Roadrunner

Greater Roadrunner

Since I have been spending more time in the house, I have been at the computer going through images from the past few months, that I hadn’t edited or sorted.  This Pyrrhuloxia was photographed in the early morning light of July 21 of this year.

Pyrrhuloxia

Pyrrhuloxia

We came across this Greater Roadrunner one day at San Angelo State Park.  He was so close to me that I opted to get a portrait of him.  I found it quite interesting.

Greater Roadrunner

Greater Roadrunner

I never pass up a chance to photograph these tiny Vermilion Flycatchers

Vermilion Flycatcher

Vermilion Flycatcher

In the birding community, the females don’t usually get their due.  The female Grosbeak, in my opinion is a beautiful bird as you might agree.

Blue Grosbeak - female

Blue Grosbeak – female

One of the cutest birds that I know of, is the Black-crested Titmouse.  But they also are very feisty and you don’t like to be messed with.

Black-crestedd Titmouse

Black-crested Titmouse

At the Hummer House down near Christoval, Texas I as enjoying photographing the many, many hummgbirds there.  I thought this image moved the cute meter up a notch.

Black-chinnedd Hummingbird

Black-chinned Hummingbird

Of all of my Great Horned Owl photos, I rank this image as one of my personal favorites.  I try to photograph this species at every opportunity.

Great Horned Owl

Great Horned Owl

This photo would fool you.  As a juvenile Curve-billed Thrasher, it has neither the curved bill nor the orange eye of the adult.

Curve-billed Thrasher - juvenile

Curve-billed Thrasher – juvenile

Another bird that is difficult photograph is the Ruby-crowned Kinglet.  To happen to catch one with the red crown showing is a bonus.

Ruby-crowned Kinglet

Ruby-crowned Kinglet

Another one with the same degree of difficulty is the cute little Blue-gray Gnatcatcher.

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher

When I was much younger and not at all interested in birds of any kind, I used to think that all the little ones were sparrows.  The medium size up was all pigeons.  The really big birds. think large and XX large, were all eagles.  Then the ones on water were all ducks.   But now that I am getting more educated in the avian species, boy, am I ever getting surprised.   I have found that there are over fifty different species of sparrows alone. Wow! Holey-moly, Batgirl!!  Who’da thought!  Well, this Grasshopper Sparrow is one of the more unusual ones.

Grasshsopper Sparrow

Grasshsopper Sparrow

I think that will be all for this post.  I hope you have enjoyed reading and seeing the photographs.

’til next time,

Happy Birding!!!

Something New, Something Old


While trying to get new material, AKA photos, for my posts, the birds are not co-0perating much for me these warm days.  But, having said that, I do have a few new ones that I captured recently, and I will combine them with some older ones from my archives.   A few of them I may have never posted, so even they may be new to you.

First, I would like to bring to your attention an error that I made a few weeks ago.  An alert reader, Carla Savage, e-mailed me and asked me to re-check the ID of a photo that I posted on July 2, as a juvenile Curve-billed Thrasher.  It turns out that it is actually a female Brown-headed Cowbird.  There are similarities, and a friend had insisted that it was the Thrasher.  I took his word, and didn’t take a closer look.  As I said they are similar to each other, however the beak of the bird in the photos, is a bit too thick for a thrasher.  I thank Carla for correcting me.

Now back to some photos.  Here are a some from my archives.

I got lucky one day at the bird blind at San Angelo State Park.  This female Ruby-throated Hummingbird showed up and really got interested int the water dripping from the rocks.

Ruby-throated Hummingbidrd

Ruby-throated Hummingbidrd – female

While roaming along the brush line at the edge of Spring Creek Park, I saw this Carolina Wren perched on a branch.

Carolina Wren

Carolina Wren

And one of my personal all time favorites, I photographed this American Kestrel at San Angelo State Park a few years ago.  Because it was so far away, the image didn’t lend itself to doing a close crop, so I opted for this nearly full frame adaptation.  Somehow, during editing I accidentally came up with this 3D effect.  I don’t have any idea, except a guess, how it happened.  But regardless how it happened, I love it.

American Kestrel in tree.

American Kestrel in tree.

A couple of years ago, during a little drive through Spring Creek Park, we spotted a large dark bird on a branch.  At first we thought it was just a Turkey Vulture.  But as we got closer we realized it was a Zone-tailed Hawk, and it had it’s lunch spread on the branch.  One reason we were initially fooled, is because the Zone-tailed Hawk behaves like a vulture.  It perches like one and flew like one.

Zone-tailed Hawk

Zone-tailed Hawk

A couple of years ago we made a trip to Pedernales State Park.  It is one our favorite birding spots when we want to make little trips out of town.  They have two large bird blinds that make for excellent bird viewing.  This is an image of a Summer Tanager that I got on that trip.

Summer Tanager

Summer Tanager

Now back to some more recent photos, I captured this Northern Bobwhite a few days ago at San Angelo State Park.

Northern Bobwhite

Northern Bobwhite

This Greater Roadrunner showed up on the same trip to that park.

Greater Roadrunner

Greater Roadrunner

This morning Ann and I visited a favorite spot near Twin Buttes Reservoir.  We saw several birds, but the following two photos were really the highlights of the one hour stay.  This adult male Painted Bunting…….

Painted Bunting

Painted Bunting

…….and this juvenile Vermilion Flycatcher, possibly a first year male.

Vermilion Flycatcher - juvenile

Vermilion Flycatcher – juvenile

I hope you enjoyed the photographs.  Click on any of the images to see some nice enlargements.

Happy Birding!!

July Fourth Holiday images


As I said before in my previous post, the weather is really warming now.  We have visited the local parks and as far as birding, the results are almost nil.  For example, Ann and I decided to check out the local parks around Lake Nasworthy this morning.  I never had a chance to press the shutter on my camera.  That is not good.  We have been having much better luck, though, at San Angelo State Park.  We have made three trips out there and by taking our time and driving over those approximately 20 miles of roads, I have picked up some very nice photographs.  We are usually home by noon as the temperatures start to reach 100° by then.  Here are some images from the past few days.  Click on any of them to see some nice enlargements.

We had reports of a Swainson’s Hawk nest, just a couple of miles from our home, off the frontage road of Loop 306.  To get a good view we had to park behind the local Steak Express and watch it from across the highway.  Thank goodness for long lenses. We parked there for about an half hour on two previous mornings and could only see a bit of feathers of a young one on the nest, behind some leaves and branches.  This third morning, we were treated with the arrival of the adult.

Swainsons's Hawk

Swainsons’s Hawk

We headed out to San Angelo State Park after that.  As we started driving around, we heard first the call of a Yellow-billed Cuckoo and a few minutes later we spotted him in the branches.

Yellow-billed Cuckoo

Yellow-billed Cuckoo

Another view of another Yellow-billed Cuckoo.

Yellow-billed Cuckoo

Yellow-billed Cuckoo

All over the park we could hear the call of the Bobwhites.  It wasn’t difficult to see some in the low tree branches.

Northern Bobwhite

Northern Bobwhite

There is an abundance of Ash-throated Flycatchers in the park.  I was able to get really close to this one, for a formal head-and-shoulders portrait.

Ash-throated Flycatcher portrait

Ash-throated Flycatcher portrait

We spotted this Blue Grosbeak from a distance.  Too far for a decent photograph.  So we decided to wait.  We sat in the car with the engine turned off and eventually it, or one just like it, finally alit about 100 feet away.  He seemed to be happy.

Blue Grosbeak

Blue Grosbeak

Another bird that is hard to get close to is the Painted Bunting.  We would spot several high in the tops of trees, but, again,  too far for a photo.  But as with the Blue Grosbeak, we eventually got lucky again and I was able the capture this one.  One just need patience.

Painted Bunting

Painted Bunting

The Common Night Hawk is just the opposite.  Pretty easy to photograph, but very difficult to find.  This one was in a tree in the Isabelle Harte Multi-use area of the park.  It was only about seven feet off of the ground, but because of their coloring we nearly missed it.  I was only about 20 feet away, in my car, AKA my mobile blind, when I made the photograph.

Common Nighthawk

Common Nighthawk

We decided to move away as I don’t like to stay too close, even though I was well hidden.  But it did eventually fly from the perch and landed across the road in another tree.  I took this next photo from farther away, and as you can see, if I didn’t already know the bird was there, it would have been hard to spot.

Common Nighthawk

Common Nighthawk

Happy Fourth of July


I am wishing everybody a happy and safe July 4th weekend.  Ann and I have been here and there since my last post, several days ago.  But, not to worry, we saw many of the avian species and I obtained a nice collection of photographs.  During that time we were invited to Stephen and Nakia’s place in the Davis Mountains.  They have several acres at an elevation of about 6,000 feet.  They have set up a nice birding area.  He had a portable blind, but I preferred my more comfortable mobile blind, AKA, my Ford Escape.  I was able to position it for nice observation and photo shooting.   I will show you a few of those images first.  Please click on any image to see a nice enlargement of each.

This photo will fool you.  It is a juvenile Curve-billed Thrasher.  Probably a first year, it hasn’t developed the long, curved bill or the bright orange eye of an adult.

CORRECTION:  It has been brought to my attention by one of my readers, that it is actually a female Brown-headed Cowbird.  I should have been more careful in checking the identification.  There are similarities but the main difference is the size of the bill.  A juvenile Curve-billed Thrasher would have been shorter, but much thinner.

Curve-billed Thrasher - juvenile

Brown-headed Cowbird – female

I love the little White-breasted Nuthatches, but they are dizzying to watch, as sometimes they are going up and other time going down head-first.

White-breasted Nuthatch

White-breasted Nuthatch

Identifying some of the flycatchers are difficult for me.  At first I thought this was an Ash-throated Flycatcher, but after seeking further advice, it was decided otherwise to be a Western Wood-Pewee.

Western Wood-Pewee

Western Wood-Pewee

In this photo of an Ash-throated Flycatcher, you can see the differences.

Ash-throated Flycatcher

Ash-throated Flycatcher

A noisy, feisth Black-crested Titmouse made it’s presence known.

Black-crested Titmouse

Black-crested Titmouse

The hummingbirds had arrived in the mountains and I caught this female Black-chinned in flight.

Black-chinned Hummingbird - female

Black-chinned Hummingbird – female

We loved being in the mountains, but we were only able to spend one day there, because of commitments back home.  After taking care of those on our return, we spent time locally and captured more photos.

Bullock’s Oriole captured near Twin Buttes Reservoir, as were the following Eastern Phoebe and the Yellow-billed Cuckoo.

Bullock's Oriole

Bullock’s Oriole

Eastern Phoebe

Eastern Phoebe

Yellow-billed Cuckoo

Yellow-billed Cuckoo

Driving downtown near the Concho River, we saw this Green Heron on the other side of the water atop a dead tree.

Green Heron in tree

Green Heron in tree

Out at San Angelo State Park, we saw these two birds, the Scissor-tailed Flycatcher and the ever popular Greater Roadrunner.

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher

Greater Roadrunner

Greater Roadrunner

I hope you all enjoyed this collection.  I will be back sometime after the holiday.

 

Happy birding!!

The Dog Days of Summer


Okay, it is starting to get hot down here in San Angelo.  I should have seen it coming.  After all, I have lived here for about 55 years.  But, to be truthful, I wouldn’t live anywhere else.  This is a city of over 100,000 that has everything a person would need.  A beautiful river runs through the town and we have three nearby lakes.  Great parks where I tend to do most of my birding and photography.  Sure it gets warm in the summer, but with our low humidity it is bearable.  I will say this, today is June 14, and we haven’t recorded our first 100° day yet.  But the day isn’ t over so today might be the day.

But as for the birding, this is the time of the year that if you don’t get out in the morning, you are missing the best part of the day.  In the afternoon, windless and warm, the birds like to lay around the house, too.  That is not to say that I don’t try.  But most of the time we are back home by noon.  Then I sit down at the computer and edit the morning’s catch.  And that includes throwing out hundreds of baddies, blurred or I some I just really don’t like.  If I shoot 200 images and get five keepers, I am a happy man.

On that note, here are a few images that I have gotten the past few days.

This White-eyed Vireo was one that almost got tossed.  He was in the dark brush and I had to up the ISO on the camera and that produced quite a bit of noise (grain).  But I liked the pose with that bit of an insect in the beak.

White-eyed Vireo

White-eyed Vireo

There are a lot of the Western Kingbirds around here now.  They don’t seem to mind the heat.

Western Kingbird

Western Kingbird

Driving through San Angelo State Park, it seemed that we were always hearing the Northern Bobwhites, no matter what our location in the park.

Northern Bobwhite

Northern Bobwhite

We were driving around Twin Buttes reservoir the next day, and low and behold we saw the same two species again.  You guessed it, another Western Kingbird and a Northern Bobwhite.

Western Kingbird

Western Kingbird

Northern Bobwhie

Northern Bobwhte

However, in addition, after hearing a Yellow-billed Cuckoo in the trees and after some searching, I got this photo.  The bird has a delicious katydid in it’s beak.

Yellow-billed Cuckoo

Yellow-billed Cuckoo

I will finish this post with this photograph of an Ash-throated Flycatcher.  Not the greatest image as he was pretty far away.  I got my long lens on him and snapped anyway.

Ash-throated Flycatcher

Ash-throated Flycatcher

So that’s it for this time.  I hope you enjoyed the photos.  Click on any of them to see some nice enlargements, especially if you are viewing them on a computer.  I don’t know how that works on an iPhone.

 

Why it Pays to Edit


Ann and I were out near Middle Concho Park yesterday.  It was getting late in the morning, the light was harsh and contrasty, and the birds were laying in for the afternoon.  However, as we were driving along, Ann was startled to see a Great Horned Owl fly from a branch near the car.  We followed along to where we thought it had landed, and eventually spotted it far back in the woods.

I turned the car around so I could get a shot through the trees from my driver’s side window.  I was using my Canon 7D Mark II and a Tamron  150-600mm lens.  Shutter priority, 1/2500 sec. @ f7.1, ISO 3200.  This is original image.

orig - Great Horned Owl

orig – Great Horned Owl

Now, this image, in itself is really not a bad photograph.  Most people would be happy to have it.  However, with a bit of cropping for composition, some color and lighting adjustments for the bright conditions, I was able to come up with this final photograph.

Great Horned Owl

Great Horned Owl

So as you can see, the camera really does lie.  It cannot always cope with difficult lighting conditions.  In this case, bright sun high in the sky, making harsh shadows.  I would prefer softer lighting, i.e. clouds covering the sun, or even overcast.  But, when trying to capture wildlife, you deal with what you have to work with.  I edited this image in Photoshop, but the minor adjustments I made could be done with any inexpensive software.  Click on either image to see enlargements.

So, enough about editing.  Monday afternoon, Ann and I were sitting in front of our house watching the neighborhood birds.  This juvenile Curve-billed Thrasher landed in our ocotillo, and minutes later an adult arrived and began feeding it with an insect of some type.  I cursed myself for leaving my camera inside.  I ran to get it, but by the time I got back the adult was gone.  However, I got some images of the young bird.  Interesting, though, that if I hadn’t seen the adult, I may not have recognized the bird for what it was.  I realized that with the juvenile, the bill is shorter and they eye has not yet achieved that fierce orange color.

Curve-billed Thrasher - juvenile

Curve-billed Thrasher – juvenile

Driving near O.C. Fisher Lake at San Angelo State Park on Sunday afternoon netted me a couple of other photos.

Ash-throated Flycatcher

Ash-throated Flycatcher

Common Nighthawk on mesquite branch.

Common Nighthawk on mesquite branch.

Well, that’s it for this post.  Catch ya in a few days.

Happy Birding!!

 

Mid-week Bird Images


In between storm alerts, showers, and chores, I have been able to get out among the birds a little bit.  We have been to the ‘mud hole’, the local parks at Lake Nasworthy, and out to the San Angelo State Park.  Some of the birds have been very nice to get in position for some nice photos.

But first, I’d like to mention that my photo of an American Robin, pictured here, is on the front cover of the May issue of “The Messenger”, a local min-news magazine of Woodstock, Nebraska.  I have been published several times, but it never fails to thrill to see my photos in the print media.

American Robin

American Robin

Now back to my photos for this post.  Click on any image to see some eye-popping enlargements, especially if you are viewing this on a computer.

There had been reports of this Summer Tanager existing in Spring Creek Park.  I had failed on previous attempts to find him.  But, finally, we were able to spot him in the trees.  He was moving around rapidly so I only had a few seconds to capture him.  He disappeared only seconds after I got this shot.  The winds messed his usual smooth hair-do a little bit, but not bad enough to make him un-recognizable.

A wind-blown male Summer Tanager.

A wind-blown male Summer Tanager.

A Curve-billed Thrasher is always fun to come across.  I love that fierce look.

Curve-billed Thrasher

Curve-billed Thrasher

This Spotted Sandpiper was strolling along the ‘mud hole’, just bobbing along.

Spotted Sandpiper

Spotted Sandpiper

A Bronzed Cowbird was all by himself at Spring Creek Park.

Bronzed Cowbird

Bronzed Cowbird

This is my firsst photo of the year of an Ash-throated Flycatcher.

Ash-throated Flycatcher

Ash-throated Flycatcher

The Lark Sparrows seem to be everywhere.  No problem locating one for a photo op.

Lark Sparrow

Lark Sparrow

Doves are another species that I tend to ignore.  I came across this one and immediatly realized that I might have been missing something.  A beautiful bird.

Mourning Dove

Mourning Dove

Last but certainly not least, is this Great Horned Owl.  Always a crowd pleaser, we came across this one by surprise when driving through Spring Creek Park.  We just happened to glance up in the trees and there he was, just staring at us.  I quickly maneuvered the car into position where I could get a shot from a distance, so as not to disturb him.  If I got a mesquite thorn in my tires, I still think it was worth it.

Great Horned Owl

Great Horned Owl

I hope you enjoyed these photos.  I don’t know if I will get time to publish a post this weekend.  We are leaving early Monday morning to spend a week of birding and photography in and around Big Bend National Park.  We have lodging reservations at the Casitas at Far Flung Outdoor Center in Study Butte.  If any of you birders will be in the area, look us up.  If I don’t post in the next few days, watch for me in about a week and a half.

 

Happy Birding!!!

Back after a brief rest……


I have been reminded that it has been about ten days since I last posted.  Sorry about that, folks.  It has been a somewhat traumatic ten days.  I was diagnosed with a severe urinary tract infection nearly two weeks ago.  An anti-biotic was prescribed.  It was the type that can have a nauseous side effect.  And it did.  We had previously made plans for a three-day trip to the Big Bend, leaving the 26th.  Up until that date, we were trying to decide if we had to cancel, as I was having some difficulty.  We decided not to cancel, and on the 26th we left, after Ann loaded the car.  I wasn’t feeling really great, but decided the worse that could happen would me spending a restful three days in a motel bed.

Well, that was not to be.  I started to have serious problems with light-headedness, nausea, and nearly passing out as soon as we arrived.  The EMTs were called to the motel, and after much discussion, we decided to return to San Angelo the following morning, with orders to see the doctor to have the meds changed.  We ended up going to the Emergency Room here in San Angelo.  By then, we were informed that the urinary tract infection was gone and to stop the meds.  To be brief, it was determined that the unsteadiness, headaches, etc., were caused by a serious sinus infection.  We had been thinking that the all the problems were caused by the prescribed antibiotics.

The sinus infections has improved although not completely gone, and I have been able to get back out the past few days and catch up on the avian populations in the San Angelo area.  We are now seeing returning grosbeaks, buntings, flycatchers and others.  All good signs of returning summer birds.

Here are a few images that I have captured since my last post.  These are from San Angelo State Park.  Please click on the images to see enlargements at their best.

Lark Bunting

Lark Bunting

Northern Bobwhite

Northern Bobwhite

Red-winged Blackbird

Red-winged Blackbird

Bullock's Oriole

Bullock’s Oriole

Blue Grosbeak - female

Blue Grosbeak – female

Ash-throated Flycatcher

Ash-throated Flycatcher

On Sunday, May 1, we ventured out to the Twin Buttes Reservoir.  I managed to get these photos although we were constantly near a bunch of noisy off-roaders in the vehicles.  Of course, the area is open to everybody, but I think a few of them were trying to make it uncomfortable for us.

Lark Spararow

Lark Spararow

Lark Bunting

Lark Bunting

Cactus Wren

Cactus Wren

Killdeer

Killdeer

By the way, lest I forget, during the few hours that we were in Big Bend National Park, I came away with the only photo of the short trip.  this Cassin’s Kingbird on an ocotillo branch in the desert.

Cassin's Kingbird

Cassin’s Kingbird

I Love Love Migration!


Boy Oh Boy, do I love this time of the year!  I don’t know why, but there seems to be an abundance of birds around the lakes and parks here in San Angelo.  It could be that all of the violent storms in east Texas could have pushed more migrating birds in this direction; or it could be that Ann and I have, with practice, developed our birding instincts and sharpened our eyes.  Whatever it is, I have been pleased at all of the photographs I have been managing to capture.

So enough talk, and let’s get to them.  Remember to click on any image to see enlargements, especially if you are viewing this on a computer.

I am going to start off with this action photo of a Western Kingbird.  By the way, it was the first of that specie that we have seen this year.  A new arrival, and a beauty.

Western Kingbird

Western Kingbird

I chose that picture to get you excited and so you would watch with anticipation for the next photos.  The next photo is of the same bird, just relaxing.

Western Kingbird

Western Kingbird

From Mary Lee Park at Lake Nasworthy, some Willets.

Willets

Willets

Willet in flight

Willet in flight

From K-Mart Creek.  My name for the water in the bar ditch near the old K-Mart site, a Yellow-crowned Night Heron.

Yellow-crowned Night Heron

Yellow-crowned Night Heron

The next few photos are from other local parks and San Angelo State Park.  This is a Canyon Towhee.

Canyon Towhee

Canyon Towhee

This Cotton-tailed Rabbit seems to be thinking, where the heck did all of these birds come from?

Cotton-tailed Rabbit

Cotton-tailed Rabbit

Great Horned Owl.

Great Horned Owl

Great Horned Owl

Bell’s Vireo sings from a tree branch.

Bell's Vireo

Bell’s Vireo

Yellow-headed Blackbird grazing in the grass.

Yellow-headed Blackbird

Yellow-headed Blackbird

Black-crowned Night Heron staring at the water, hoping to catch a meal.

Black-crowned Night Heron

Black-crowned Night Heron

Last but certainly not least, this image of a cute Grasshopper Sparrow.

Grasshopper Sparrow

Grasshopper Sparrow

You may remember that Ann and I saw 44 species on a recent outing.  Today, April 21, we surpassed that with a total of 50 for four hours of birding, and that doesn’t count the rabbit. 🙂

I hope you enjoyed the photos.  A reminder, any and all photos are available for sale.  Just contact me, if you would be proud to have one of my works hanging on your wall.

 

Happy Birding!!