Lewis’s Woodpecker – Number 200 for year


We had gotten reports that a Lewis’s Woodpecker was hanging around the the north part of San Angelo State Park.  We decided that it would be worth the drive to get a chance to view it, since I only needed to get one more to hit my goal of 200 birds for the year 2014.  Being that the park is very large, we had a nine mile drive to the north entrance.

Pat Bayles, one of the rangers, saw us at the entrance gate and told us that it was being seen about a quarter of a mile down the road, in a copse of trees near some picnic tables.  We drove down there and as we got there, a friend of ours, Randy Hesford, was already there and he had his camera trained on the bird a couple of hundred yards away.  I grabbed my camera and got out of the car.

The bird moved to another tree about 250 yards away.  The sky was very overcast, but we could make him out easily with our binoculars.  However with the lighting conditions, it was practically just a silhouette through the camera’s viewfinder.  Even adding a couple of stops to my Exposure Compensation, didn’t help much, as you can see in these photos.  I tried to adjust the lighting in my post processing, but with not much success.  Of course, with such a distance, I also had to crop extensively.

Lewis's Woodpecker

Lewis’s Woodpecker

Lewis's Woodpecker

Lewis’s Woodpecker

By contrast, here is a photo that I took a couple of years ago when a Lewis’s Woodpecker made an appearance here.

Lewis's Woodpecker

Lewis’s Woodpecker

Conditions were much better then, and the bird was a litle bit closer.  At least those photos above provide enough to help identify the bird.  So now that I have my 200 for the year, I hope to add more this week during our trip to Fort Davis.

So this is definitely my last post until our return next week.

Quiz result – Woodpecker species


Thanks to all participating in my latest quiz.  Click here to review it.  The bird is a Lewis’s Woodpecker.  It was photographed here in San Angelo, Texas.  It was really out of range for that species.  But, as sometimes happens, he wandered off course during migration, and ended up here.  He was observed for about three days, then he moved on.

I only had one shot at him.  We were driving through Middle Concho park, when Ann spotted high atop a dead tree branch.  After I took the photo, he then flew off into some other trees.  I never saw him again.

Lewis's Woodpecker

Lewis’s Woodpecker