Feisty Black-crested Titmouses


The Black-crested Titmouse (Baeolophus atricristatus), is the western version of the eastern Tufted Titmouse.  A cute, but feisty, little bird that is one of my favorites.  I took the following photographs a couple of years ago with my Canon 40D camera.  I came across the images when sorting through a few this morning and I thought you’d like to see them.

Black-crested Titmouse
  •  Canon EOS 40D with Canon 100-400 zoom lens
  • 1/800 sec. @ f6.3 – ISO 400
  • Partial metering – Aperture priority
Black-crested Titmouse
  •  Canon EOS 40D with Canon 100-400mm zoom lens
  • 1/400 sec. @ f6.3 – ISO 640
  • Partial metering – Aperture priority
Black-crested Titmouse
  • Canon EOS 40D with Canon 500mm lens w/1.4 tele-converter
  • 1/250 sec. @ f5.6 – ISO 800
  • Center weighted metering – Aperture priority

    Black-crested Titmouse

  • Canon EOS 40D with Canon 500mm lens w/1.4 tele-converter
  • 1/800 sec. @ f5.6 – ISO 500
  • Center weighted metering – Aperture priority

I hope that you have enjoyed these images of the ferocious little bird.  Click on any of them to see an enlargement.

 

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16 thoughts on “Feisty Black-crested Titmouses

  1. We have the Juniper Titmouse here..they special..your photos are wonderful as usual..I will find a photo of a titmouse I painted and post on my web…God Bless…keep the shutters flying as we look forward to your daily posts..

    • Co-incidentally I was just looking at pictures of the Juniper Titmouse in my Stokes guide. They are interesting, too, in that they are plain gray color all over. Thanks again for writing, Syl. :-)

  2. Bob, These are all lovely pictures! I think the Titmice are one of the more interesting birds with their little ‘Robin Hood’ hats (if you will). BTW, if you know, how is it that the last one has been banded? Are the black crested endangered, or perhaps their migratory patterns are being tracked? Just curious, Lynda

    • There are licensed bird banders in Texas. They catch the little birds in mist nets. The bands are numbered, of course, and they can be followed if caught by banders in other states, etc. They provide a valuable service, to track the migratory patterns and habits that you mentioned. Thanks for writing. :-)

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