Cattle and Snowy Egrets


I am still editing old images that were taken a couple of years ago.  They may have been seen in a previous blog post.  But with new software I think I am improving the images for sharpness and definition.  This first one is a Cattle Egret.  The photo was taken at Big Bend National Park.  We were just entering the park, and there were several of the egrets perched in some Ocotillo bushes a few yard off of the road.

Cattle Egret

  • Canon EOS 40D
  • Canon 100-400mm zoom lens
  • 1/400 sec. @ f22 – minus 1/3 EV adjustment
  • ISO  500
  • Lens focal distance 400mm
  • Metering – center weighted
  • Aperture priority

This image of a Snowy Egret was taken below the Lake Nasworthy dam in San Angelo, Texas.  He was intent on his fishing and was oblivious of me.  I was able to get within 50 feet to get the photograph.

Snow Egret

  • Canon EOS 40D
  • Canon 500mm IS lens with 1.4 tele-converter
  • 1/3200 sec. @ f6.3
  • ISO 400
  • Lens focal distance  700mm
  • Metering – partial
  • Aperture priority

I hope you again enjoy the images.  Click on either of them for enlargements.

Brown Thrasher and Loggerhead Shrike


Well, I am still working on re-doing some older photographs.  These are some that I almost threw away.  But after taking a second look and doing some editing I think they are passable to show off.  I hope you enjoy.  Click on either one for an enlargement.

Portrait of a Brown Thrasher

Brown Thrasher (Toxostoma rufum).  Found mostly east of the Rockies.

  • Canon EOS 7D
  • Canon 500mm IS with 1.4 tele-converter
  • 1/1000 sec. @ f8 minus 1/3 EV adjustment
  • ISO 640
  • Lens focal distance  700mm
  • Metering – partial
  • Aperture priority

Loggerhead Shrike

Who was that masked ……bird??  Loggerhead Shrike (Lanius ludovicianus) This masked, ferocious little guy is found throught out the south and southwest.

  • Canon EOS 40D
  • Canon 100-400mm zoom lens
  • 1/4000 sec @ f5.6
  • ISO 400
  • Lens focal distance  400mm
  • Metering – center weighted
  • Aperture priority

Dry O. C. Fisher Reservoir – San Angelo, Texas


I have been talking about how dry our O. C. Fisher lake was.  Now here is proof, with these aerial photos that were taken and sent to me.  All that is left is that puddle of toxic water that is standing outside the outlet.  Please notice all of the fish kill that has taken place.  The gray area you see is dry lake bed.

You can see the high water mark on the concrete building where the lake level once was back in the mid-sixties.  Then it gradually dropped down to the level just above the outlet openings where it stayed until about a year ago when this latest drought started.

I have been going through some photos of some of the wildlife that used to be in abundance at the lake.  This is an image of an American White Pelican.  We probably won’t see any of them for awhile.  It was while I was taking this photo that a Northern American Bobcat rushed by within 4 feet of Ann, who standing behind me, and nearly knocked her down.  It was chasing a Jackrabbit, and probably didn’t notice us.

American White Pelican

  • Canon EOS 40D
  • Canon 500mm with 2x tele-converter – tripod mounted.
  • 1/2000 sec. @ f8
  • ISO  400
  • Lens focal distance  1000mm
  • Metering – center weighted
  • Aperture priority

I hoped you enjoyed the photos.  Click on any of them to see enlargements.

Middle Concho Park – Hot Friday Afternoon


We decided to get in our air-conditioned car for a short trip to Middle Concho Park.  Just to get out of the house.  Got a couple of good pictures.  One of a Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) and a Great Egret (Ardea alba).  We also saw what I think was a Long-billed Curlew (Limosa fedoa).  If it was a curlew, it was a bit out of season for this part of the state.  But strange sightings are almost the norm lately.  I didn’t get a photo so I am unable to confirm it.

Great Blue Heron

  • Canon EOS 7D
  • Canon 500mm IS lens with 1.4 televerter – hand-held
  • 1/2000 sec. @f5.6
  • ISO 400
  • Lens focal distance  700mm
  • Metering – partial
  • Manual exposure

Great Egret

  • Canon EOS 7D
  • Canon 500mm IS lens with 1.4 tele-converter – hand-held
  • 1/1600 sec. @f10 minus 1.7 EV adjustment
  • ISO 400
  • Lens focal distance  700mm
  • Metering – partial
  • Aperture priority

I hope you enjoyed the photos.  Click on either one to see an enlargement.

Concho River – Mississippi Kite


We thought we’d take a break this morning and take a drive to downtown San Angelo, and cruise a bit along the Concho River.  It was really nice down there but a bit on the humid side.  Not like up north, though, and it will disappear as the sun rises to it’s usual 100 degree mark.  I was pleased to come across this Mississippi Kite, (Ictinia mississippiensis).  This smallish raptor is beginning to show up more in increasing numbers in this area.

Mississippi Kite

  • Canon EOS 7D
  • Canon 500mm IS lens with 1.4 tele-converter – tripod mounted
  • 1/1000 sec @ f9 –  plus 1/3 EV adjustment
  • ISO 400
  • Lens focal distance 700mm
  • Metering – partial
  • Shutter priority

After spending time photographing the kite, we continued and came upon these two photo opportunities.

Great Blue Heron

  • Canon EOS 7D
  • Canon 100-400mm lens
  • 1/1600 sec. @ f5.6 – minus 1/3 EV adjustment
  • ISO 250
  • Lens focal distance 260mm
  • Metering – partial
  • Shutter priority

Cormorant and Turtles

  • Canon EOS 7D
  • Canon 100-400mm lens
  • 1/2000 sec. @ f5.6 – minus 1/3 EV adjustment
  • ISO 1000
  • Lens focal distance 350mm
  • Metering partial
  • Shutter priority

I hope you enjoyed the photos.  Click on any one of them to see beautiful enlargements.

Tweaking My New Gallery and other news


I have been busy loading photographs into my new on-line gallery, so I haven’t been able to find time to write a new blog article.  So be patient, my dear readers, and I will have some new exciting tales of photographic adventures for you soon.

To update you on my gallery, here are the highlights.  I first closed down my original web-site.  Some of you may not even be aware that I had one.  But that site was from where I imported the slide shows that I had on my blog originally.  Combining my blog with my new image collection does the same that my big web-site did, but in a more simpler way.

My new gallery has the best of my best images.  You can click on my gallery link either from the button at the top of this page, or the link on the right side.  There you can look at the photographs, click on them for an enlargement and more information about the image.  You can also select Portfolio, then Collections, and see slide shows of my different categories.

Another nice feature that I think you will like is FREE E-CARDS.  That’ right, I said free.  You simply click on the image as I explained.  Then underneath the enlargement you will see a tiny “e-card” logo.  Click on that, type your little message, and send an e-card to anyone you wish, for any occasion, using my photograph, free of charge.  You can begin to use that service immediately.

To make a purchase, click the “buy” logo under the enlargement, and you will be shown options such as size, paper type, and price.  Or you can forget the whole thing and just look at the photos. 🙂

My annual calendars won’t available in the gallery.  I will have them for sale separately, again at 20.00 including shipping.  The 2012 edition is currently in production and they should be available around the end of August.  The demand was so great last year that I want to make sure that I have enough.  I still do business the old-fashioned way.  You trust me, and I will trust you with an “e-handshake”.  Just mail me a check for 20.00, and I’ll get one in the mail to you.  For quantities of more than two, contact me by e-mail or by phone, 325-944-1839, for adjusted pricing.

Now I must get back to adding more photos to the gallery.  By the way, you can keep up with the additions, by checking back once or twice a day.

Great Horned Owlet II


Before I forget, please note my new on-line photo gallery.  I think you will like it.  Click this link PhotoGallery, then add it to your favorites.  🙂

I apologize for the confusion in yesterday’s post about the link.

You probably have seen my previous post about the young Great Horned Owl.  Yesterday morning we took a little drive through Spring Creek Park, and we saw the little creature again.  This time he/she had roamed into an area of trees that were “owned” by a bunch of Northern Mockingbirds.  They were chasing him, and actually physically bumping him when ever he lit on a tree branch.  He couldn’t sit still for a minute, before one of the mockingbirds ran into him, trying to knock him off of his perch.  I managed to get this photo, plus a few others, before I decided he had enough to contend with, without having to fear me also.

  •  Canon EOS 7D
  • Canon 100-400 zoom lens
  • 1/500 sec. @ f5.6
  • ISO 200
  • Lens focal distance 370mm